Hunting in South Africa

Actions

No files uploaded

Have you ever hunted in South Africa? If you haven't, what would you love to hunt in Africa? I am from South Africa, I was born and raised in the Bushveld. Hunting has been part of my life as long as I can remember. I would like to hear your African adventures. If you are planning a trip in the near future, i'd also be happy to tell you what to expect or try to clear up any other questions you have. Lets talk AFRICA...

Discussion started by Mara Nel , on 1916 days ago
Replies
Mara Nel
The lion hunt was amazing! And very scary! We hunt lion basically like most methods used, we don't use bait or anything like that. We drive with our very skilled tracker sitting on die hood part of the truck (bakkie), when we find lion tracks, we start to follow the track of a large male (there were 2 large males in the one area which threw us off a few times). Stalking in the hottest time of day, with flies biting you makes it even harder! And you have to be very careful as they could be lying in the grass or between trees (I guess stepping on a resting lions tail would end bad if you don't spot him with some distance between you). Finally after a few hours, Tim (Our friend and hunter from America) spotted the lion, he was walking away just after feeding off a warthog that he caught. Tim fired and the lion fell strait away. As for the female white lion. Same tracking method was used, but we saw her when she was about 20 or 30 meters away from us, walking straight towards us! I could hear every single persons heart beat! The part of the bush was very dense, so shot placement was tricky! All I can honestly remember after the first shot was a very very angry lion 15 meters away from us! I will be honest, I nearly peed in my pants! But the hunt was amazing and life changing! I have so much respect for these incredible animals!
1873 days ago
 
Chauncey
We were hoping you might extend some of your Lion Hunting comments here. We would love to here more about that kind of exciting adventure. How you tracked the animals, what type of gear you used, and the over all experience. We would also like to here about why you thought it was a good time to take these animals from your herd.
1874 days ago
 
Mara Nel
I'd love to! I will start working on it as soon as possible and email it to you
1904 days ago
 
Chauncey
Mara,
Would you be interested in writing up a little story about Maroi and what you guys are all about and e mail it to us at info@shotemandcaughtem.com we would love to share more about your outfit in our blog if you would be interested. As a trade out we would send you some free apparel to wear out on your adventures.
1906 days ago
 
Mara Nel
That giraffe that i shot is being shoulder mounted at the lodge. Hunters always use their trophies for mounts or flat skins, the only time that we don't use the horns is during culling when we hunt non trophies. But the skins always make nice mats, we use anything we can off a hunted animal, and non of the meat goes to waste, we sell it, use it ourselves or we donate meat. That giraffe gave us 840kg of meat and all of it went to good use.
1913 days ago
 
Mara Nel
Maroi Conservancy is located on the border of Zimbabwe, that means we are on the red line for foot and mouth disease (we can bring animals in, but we cant sell them alive by game captures) so we bring new animals in, to keep the gene pool big and we have to cull if the animals exceeds the carrying capacity of the farm. This is why hunting is very important where I live, we cater for international trophy hunters and also local hunters. Poaching is pretty bad, but we try to manage it all the time, we have game scouts and security patrolling the area day and night, poaching will always be there unfortunately... well hunting in Africa is an adventure on its own, there are more wonderful stories than sad stories in my opinion, because we hunt ethically, my dad always says that our animals are not tide to trees, we never guarantee that someone will shoot a trophy, but we can guarantee that there are trophies.
1913 days ago
 
Kyle Peters
Very jealous of all of you hunting adventures from looking at your amazing pictures. What do you generally do with your trophies. I know some you can obviously mount but unless you have a huge home I am not sure how you could mount a giraffe. Very Cool
1913 days ago
 
Chauncey
So how does the conservancy work? Do you raise and thin your own herds? How do you regulate your animals populations? Do you purchase animals from other areas etc? Is the poaching problem as bad as the news says? You hear both great and sad stories when it comes to hunting in Africa. Thought it would be nice to here it from someone who has lived it.
1913 days ago
 
Mara Nel
I consider myself lucky to be able to live on a farm in Africa, every day is different here, during a walk and stalk hunt, you never know what to expect, you never know what you'll see and that's why every story you hear of an Africa hunt, will be different! To answer your question, MY personal favourite was hunting the blue wildebeest; the reason is that the hunt tested me in every way! I thought I knew a lot about hunting until it took me 3 days of tracking and walking to find this specific bull. On the second day of this hunt, i was following the herd and came across a sick blue wildebeest calf, so what i did was only human, i caught the calf and took it home to care for it :) Then on the third day i finally got my bull and took him down with a heart shot. This was my best and most exciting hunt, I also had a few obstacles on the way, like running into a puff adder and realising that my water got left behind after about 5km of walking... For other hunters, their own favourite is always different, most overseas hunters that have been by us liked hunting cats (leopard, african wild cat ect.) and for the thrill seekers i recommend the buffalo! These are also big favourites: Steinbuck, Duiker, Impala, Eland, Serval, Civet, Porcupine, warthog, bushpig, and the list goes on! You should also know that we are very flexible, if a hunter sees something, and he wants it, he can shoot, unless the animal requires a cites permit before the hunt.
1914 days ago
 
Chauncey
WOW. What a interesting place to go up. I am sure that you must have a ton of great stories of things you have had the opportunity to do growing up and being involved with when in a location such as Africa. I guess my first question would be from all the opportunities you have had what is your favorite animal to hunt and why. I am sure that many people might take the opportunity to travel to a place such as yours for the experience but might not know which animal would be the most challenging or offer the most excitement. We would love to hear your input on the subject. Thanks for starting the discussion.
1914 days ago