The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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Social Media in Uproar over the Death of Cecil a prized African Lion

It is a fine line that all those that hunt and fish are faced with on a regular basis.  Many on the outside feel that the passion we have for the great outdoors is barbaric at best.  Many of us that are a part of our love for the great outdoors cringe when yet another bad apple rises to the surface.  Especially one that has tested the line before.  On July 1st we were made aware by the folks at GrindTV about another such case.  After many of the articles written about the social out cry after legal kills of lions over the past year you would assume that someone like this would be a bit more cautious when testing the line of a legal or illegal kill.  As many of us know it is the judgement of the person behind the weapon to secure that they are making a legal kill not blame the guide.

Death of Northern White Rhino 

This news coming just before the news that the world has only 4 northern white rhinos left, three of which are still in the wild.  Though they are being protected around the clock, money procured through legal hunts affords this security, news such as the illegal lion hunt taint the good we do as a community overall.  It provides ammunition to a crowd of haters that should be silenced by how much we do to continue and preserve the vary animals we love to eat and/or catch.  

Hunting is Conservation

It sounds weird but it has been proven time and time again.  When a hunter, angler or just your average joe respect and care for the rules, regulations and support the industry through obtaining the proper forms and licenses we conserve.  There are hundreds of websites even our own that consistently taught the great things we do for our environment and mutual inhabitants.  Like in many of the different areas of our world and our lives the mistakes of the few should not be the burden of the many.  We hope you continue to help support different great organizations and social media outlets to help promote all the great things we do to help protect and grow the populations and species we have the passion to share on the photo walls.  The gear section is a great place to share your food plots and ideas on how to promote the species in the lakes, ponds and on the lands you venture to on a regular basis.  It will only be a matter of time before we as a community will grow to one large voice.  We hope that you help us grow our member base so that we can make that voice stronger.

 

Thursday, 05 June 2014 21:48

If we were to Ban Hunting and Fishing

With the recent news of Metallica's front man James Hetfield taking heat for just being the voice of a new hunting series, we at Shotem and Caughtem felt it was once again time to search the internet for more articles related to the subject of hunting.  Right wrong or indifferent, however, one might feel about the subject no one nation or country feels the effects of this debate more than Africa.  A constant struggle between available resources, a huge human population and not enough food produced to sustain growth.  No one knows the battle better than those who live that life day to day.  We already have some great members who share their adventures from this region so it was not hard for us to turn to resource that would report on what is happening through their own eyes.  We hope that you take the time to read and forward this well written article to those who judge without proper evidence of just how beneficial our passion for this lifestyle can be and it's effects.  A big thanks to All Africa for sharing their views.  

Here is just a brief excerpt from the article the link to the full article is below:

Put very simply - if wildlife does not generate benefits, it will be displaced by agriculture and other land uses. Even national parks must provide benefits to neighbouring communities if they are to be viable conservation entities, rather than isolated islands surrounded by conflicting land uses and communities hostile to conservation.

By allowing wildlife management to be a viable land use, with both hunting and tourism providing the returns, large tracts of African habitat can be maintained in a healthy state. This includes habitat for valuable, rare and endangered species such as rhino, elephant, lion, leopard, cheetah and numerous other species. In Namibia, healthy populations of all these species occur in communal areas, on private land and in national parks - simply because they generate income. Take away legal trophy hunting, and wildlife will be the loser. Commercial poaching is minimal in Namibia, because poaching is seen as stealing from local communities. In the very few incidents of rhino poaching, the help of local people has lead to the arrest of the culprits.

What of the ethical and moral implications of hunting a wild animal?

At some stage, each individual animal must die. That is part of the cycle of life itself. Generally, old or weak wild animals die a painful or violent death - either from starvation or disease, or by being killed and eaten by predators, or by being killed by rivals of their own species.

But the overall population continues to thrive - as long as there is enough suitable habitat available.

Saying 'I don't want any animals to die' does not help the situation. Becoming a vegetarian will not save any African wildlife. Condemning legal hunting does not help either. African land is needed to generate livelihoods - if these livelihoods are not generated through wildlife use, then wildlife disappears. The less wildlife is used, the less it will be able to survive.

Eating game meat is in fact an ecologically sustainable option, because it adds another area of income that gives people the incentive to allow wildlife to remain on the land.

Trophy hunting generally focuses on post-reproductive males, as these have the most mature trophies. Only a very small percentage of the population is hunted (0.5 to 2%), with no impact on the overall health of the species.

To read more of this article follow the link http://allafrica.com/stories/201406050519.html 

Wednesday, 04 September 2013 19:47

African Safari Hunt on Your Bucket List?

We at Shotem and Caughtem were a little excited when Mara decided to become a member of our website.  She has lived and been apart of a conservancy for most of her life in Africa.  With that we were ecstatic when she decided to help us out a little with informing more of our members about opportunities and possibilities in Africa.  She has also started her own discussion so others can ask her direct questions about Africa, their services and her personal experiences.  If you would like to join the discussion visit www.shotemandcaughtem.com.  Here is a little more background about her organization. 

Maroi Conservancy:


Maroi is situated in the Limpopo Valley on the banks of the mighty Limpopo River in South Africa. Maroi was established in 1993.

Maroi Conservansy caters for the hunting of a wide variety of game and game birds for the local and International hunter. We also cater for deep see fishing at our lodge in Mozambique, in the unspoilt waters of the Pomene area.

Maroi Conservancy focuses on sustaining the environment and the beauty of Africa for many generations to come, hunting is very important to us in order to manage population numbers as the animals can not be relocated due to foot and mouth disease along the border line. 

Ethical hunting is also very important to us, all the game including 3 of the big five are free roaming and wild, the success of a hunt is determined by the patience and enthusiasm of the hunter, our trained professional hunters and game trackers are always there to motivate and ensure a successful hunt.

Hunting in Africa is hunting on its own level, one can not compare it to anything else, mainly because every story you hear of Africa is different, some good, some life changing, therefore I can only tell you that much about hunting or fishing in Africa, the rest is your story to tell.

Visit our website for more information on Maroi Conservancy: www.maroiconservancy.co.za

 

 

Published in User Spotlight
Wednesday, 03 April 2013 23:00

Monster Barracuda Caught Might be a Record

We at Shotem and Caughtem have had the opportunity to snorkle with a lot of different fish.  Some of which have made the hair on the back of our necks stand up.  One of these fish would have to be the barracuda.  You hear stories of how aggressive the can be and their sharp teeth and over all bad appereance doesn't help to calm ones nerves.  Most of the ones we have seen swimming through the water were around a 40 to 50 pound 3 feet long sized, but still commanded our attention.  So when we heard that 7ft 102 pound barracuda was caught we felt that this was one to report.  Gibson caught the huge barracuda while fishing for Tarpon on the Cuanza River in Angola, Africa.  It is currently under review as to whether it is in fact a new world all tackle record beating out the 101 pound barracuda also caught in Africa.  Share your big stories and catches on the Caughtem braggin wall and leave your comments in the section below.