The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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We at Shotem and Caughtem love perusing the internet for interesting hunting and fishing topics.  However, we recently stumbled across a hunting story that we thought was so outrageous considering our economic climate we felt it was worth sharing and getting feedback.

Sterilizing Doe Deer to control Population

No you read that right and if you would like to read more about it here is the link to the story we found about deer sterilization.  Trying not to talk politics we will just look at the financials.  You have hunters who go year after year sometimes with unfilled tags who would gladly put there name in a lottery or even pay a little extra to get some extra time in the field and get the meat they need.  A win win.  Last time I checked there are few states since the recent recession that are operating in the black.  So a good way to maybe bring in some money left on the table would not be spending a half a million dollars to try and curb population through medicine and instead through putting food on the table and money in the states wallet. 

State budgets and Alternative Hunting Ideas

It amazes us sometimes how the anti hunting population can offer a voice that makes absolutely no financial or scientific results and spend that kind of money.  Hopefully some in the state will wise up and maybe increase the number of tags or like in our state offer a bonus doe season early in the year to help draw done population numbers.  More tags, more money for the state and less does.  MAKES SENSE TO US FOR SURE......

We would love to share your feedback and comments through more discussions in the comment section below.

 

Friday, 05 September 2014 19:37

Opening Dove Hunting Season and Banded Dove

Dove Hunting Season came with it's share of Weather problems and Heavy rainfall

We at Shotem and Caughtem headed out for the season opener of hunting season.  Dove Season is officially here in most states.  The season opener did not come without its challenges.  As a matter of fact the place where we started or hunt and worked so hard to create the perfect environment received 6 in of rain in the six hours before the opening day.  Needless to say another season might have gone into the wind.  With thousands of places to source water the dove hunting in our premier spot was slow at best.  We still left the field with our limit but that was merely due to determination and patience.  

Searching for the perfect Dove Hunting Environment

We decided the next day to head to another spot we know of and try our luck since it did not have the large amount of rain we had experienced at our other spot.  Luckily for us this place was the mecca we were looking for.  And as a bonus after hunting dove for well over a decade we not only landed our first banded dove ever, but the people we hunted with ended up shooting 8 banded dove total.  A very cool experience we had never had the pleasure of experiencing.  Heck we might have even missed these bands in the past.  Not only are they small and hard to see the first we found was tucked under feathers making it even harder to notice.  We did not even see the first one till we were cleaning the birds.  From that point on we ended up being more tuned to looking for the small devices.

What to do if you get a banded dove

For you prize by calling into the number listed on the band you are sent a digital certificate of your find so that you can get some information about where the dove has been.  Agencies use these bands to track not only movement but population growth etc.  It was a great hunt and even cooler experience.

Banded Dove information

As a matter of fact we are heading back out tonight to hopefully get our last hunt in before a cold front moves in and potentially pushes the dove south in their migration towards the far southern states and eventually into South America for the winter.  As always we hope you share your dove hunting photos and stories to the galleries.  Hope you all have a great Shotem and Caughtem weekend.  

Tuesday, 15 October 2013 17:53

Perfect Storm Bad for Moose

We at Shotem and Caughtem thought we would pass along some information so that the hunting community could help aid in research surrounding a large population decrease in Moose which will have a large effect on hunting permits.  Researchers are trying to figure out causes associated with a halving of Moose population across a wide range of the North American continent.  

Three things seem to be having the greatest effect on the Moose.  Weather, Bugs and Food.  Shorter winters and increase temperatures are causing the cool friendly Moose to work harder to keep their body temperatures low.  Because of the warmer temperatures bugs such as beetles who eat the Moose cover, ticks and worms that carry disease they are causing more Moose to become sick.  These bugs are also causing a depletion of trees that the Moose use for cover from predators, regulate body temperature and as a food source.  

The declining Moose population could cause more problems than just for hunters.  As always many species are dependent on Moose.  Their a food source for apex predators, keep forage low for birds and trees trimmed for other herbivores.  

We can help scientist answer questions when out in the field.  Providing data from the Moose we make contact with such as location, health, and looking the animal over when it comes to coats, horns etc could all be vital information to help to cause.  Contact the Minnesota Department of Wildlife which seems to be the one spear heading the research should you have any information on Moose in your area http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/index.html 

As always keep posting photos and leave your comments in the section below.  It is part of our duty as hunters to help make sure future generations get the opportunity to hunt these majestic animals.   

 

We at Shotem and Caughtem have talked in not only the discussion board but also blogged about the predator vs prey debate.  It definitely is a heated topic between many groups.  However, many people of Alaska live from the land and need certian animals to sustain their needs.  Moose is definately a large part of the needs associated with feeding Alaska families through the winter.  Due to this reason Alaska wildlife officials are doing their best to try and create a sustainable Moose and Caribou population so that hunters can stock their freezers for the harsh conditions.  In order to try and accomplish this they opened a short window so that they could harvest part of their large bear population.  It will not only benefit the prey populations but the meat was then destributed to Alaskan residents to help feed families.  Here are the details.

A predator control program has resulted in the killing of nearly 90 bears in Western Alaska.

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner (http://is.gd/BEAihS) reports that the program designed to increase moose in the area is operating in game management unit 19A along the Kuskokwim River.

According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, agency staff shot 89 bears between May 13 and Monday, when the two-year program ended for the year. Officials say 84 black bears and five grizzlies were killed.

Biologists shot the bears from a helicopter in a 530-square mile area of state land that is a small part of unit 19A, which encompasses nearly 10,000 square miles east of Aniak. 

The meat was then distributed to local residents.

Let us know your opinion on the subject in the comment section below or on the discussion board http://www.shotemandcaughtem.com/groups-main/viewdiscussion/8-predator-prey-balance-hunting-and-conservation.html?groupid=2.  As always post your photos to the galleries and tell us about your adventure.

Friday, 10 May 2013 15:45

Deer Birth Control? Seriously?

We at Shotem and Caughtem built this website as a fun social network so that hunters and fisherman/woman had a place to come and brag about their experiences.  We have done our best to merely give our readers the facts and allow them to comment.  We never want this blog or website to ever become a place that begins to take sides so to speak.  However, when we heard that the Humane Society of America proposed a contraceptive device as a way to curb deer populations in the Washington, D.C. area we had to share our thoughts.  Here is what had been reported.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has recently offered their suggestion on how to cut an increased deer population in Washington D.C.- birth control.

Deer populations in Rock Creek Park in D.C. have increased to 3-5 times more than what the National Park Service (NPS) deems sufficient, causing the NPS to take action. Controlled hunting has been successfully used as a means to limit the population – something hunters are willing to do and even to pay for the opportunity.  But HSUS sees this as a “wasteful killing program.”

HSUS is pushing the NPS to administer a form of birth control known as porcine zona pellucida (PZP) that causes antibodies to bind to a deer’s eggs to block fertilization. Administering PZP is expected to cost taxpayers $340,000 for just the Rock Creek Park alone according to humanewatch.org.  HSUS has offered to pay for half of the program, leaving taxpayers “holding the bag” for the rest of the cost.

Hunting has been proven as an effective way to curb populations of certain species when the opportunity to do so is done with a fair cost to the hunter.  Many fail to realize or admit that the sport of hunting has gotten quite expensive.  (The equipment needed and also finding a place to hunt that does not cost an arm and a leg no pun intended) To get permitted to do so can cost a lot of money not to mention travel, processing etc.  I have never heard a hunter turn away from a chance to go hunting if cost factors are not outrageous.  Heck the TV Show Chasing Tail is based on this very premise.  Guys who like to hunt get access to ground in trade for some meat.  Happy hunter = Happy landowner.  If there were more who adopted this principal I would guess we might not have near the hog problem.  I know that if I saw a Craiglist ad that said WANTED/TRADE responsible hunter to come and help us out by getting rid of some hogs in trade for some of the meat.  Please send us references and resume, I would be all over sending my information.  

So instead of spending money, why would they not make a little money by selling decently priced permits and finding a way to give responsible hunters access to the areas that need a little population control.  Heck I know that the population of the needy is pretty high in D.C. how about this as a solution.  Take a weekend to interview hunters as a way to find good, responsible people who would hunt, tag (Give Tax Write Off) and take the deer to be processed by a local butcher willing to donate his/her time (Tax Write Off) to process the meat and then take it to the local shelters to feed the needy (Save Tax Payers Money).  Let us know your opinion in the comment section below and keep posting pics and sharing stories in the gallery sections.  

 

Friday, 15 February 2013 18:14

New Legislation on Wolf Hunting in Montana

A wolf management bill that won overwhelming support in the Montana Legislature was signed into law Wednesday by Gov. Steve Bullock.

Bullock said House Bill 73, sponsored by Rep. Kelly Flynn, R-Townsend, will allow hunters to purchase up to three wolf licenses and lowers the price of a nonresident wolf license from $350 to $50. The measure also will strengthen state wildlife officials’ efforts to manage Montana’s recovered and growing wolf population, he said.

The legislation was amended by lawmakers to allow hunting and trapping of wolves near national parks and allow wildlife officials to close such areas after established wolf harvest quotas are met.

In signing the legislation, Bullock asked FWP to ramp up education programs aimed at averting the harvest of collared wolves near national parks.

The new law also allows wolf hunters to use their license 24 hours after its purchase, instead of having to wait five days; authorizes the use of electronic calls; and removes the requirement for hunter-orange clothing after the general deer and elk seasons have ended.

The minimum estimate of Montana’s wolf population at the end of 2011 was 653 wolves in 130 verified packs and 39 breeding pairs. New official population estimates are expected in March. Montana’s wolf hunting and trapping seasons are open through Feb. 28. So far, hunters have killed 115 wolves and trappers have harvested 84.

For more information, visit www.fwp.mt.gov and follow the “Montana Wolf Hunt” link.
Thursday, 07 February 2013 21:09

Minnesota Cancels Moose Hunting Season

Though the Department of Natural Resources has said that hunting has not been the cause of the decline, Shotem and Caughtem learned on Weds. that they will be banning indefinitely moose hunting season throughout Minnesota.  The population of moose has decreased in the state by 52% since 2010, for reasons unknown at this time.  Several possibilities have been proposed such as ticks, food sources, water pathogens, and as we reported yesterday dry/hot summers, which moose don't handle well.  In an aerial survey in January, state officials calculated that only 2,760 moose were left in the state, down by 35% from last year and 52% from 2010.  State officials have responded by launching a 1.2 million dollar campaign to what is being called the largest and most high-tech effort to help root out the cause of the dwindling moose population. 
Wednesday, 06 February 2013 19:28

Drought Conditions Report

As is the case with many areas around the United States we are in the midst of a wide spread drought.  Low lake and river conditions are going to cause major problems for much of Mother Natures children.  Here in Kansas we have already seen a huge reduction in many bird species and our low lakes and streams will have an effect on our fish populations.  Low water conditions have made it hard for many species to survive and reproduce.  It will undoubtibly have an effect on the spring fish spawning season since many of those habitats no longer have water.  It will be more important than ever to make sure all hunters and fisherman adhere to restrictions.  We will be dealing with a population decrease throughout many species.  All the different lakes have been recording record low conditions.  Table Rock Lake, Mo last spring had water flowing over it's dam due to record amounts of rain.  Today the lake is 10ft below normal levels.  Beaver Lake, Ar. is down 13ft.  Even Lake Huron and Lake Michigan have diverted cargo ships due to the low water levels.  Across much of the Midwest these conditions can be seen in even smaller lakes and streams.  Around our area lakes, ponds and streams on many farms and ranches have not gone dry like this since the dust bowl.  Texas has seen a decrease in not only the population but in the size of their deer.  Pheasant hunting was non exsistant this year in much of Kansas.  Hopefully rain will come before it has drastic effects on the fish population since they have not yet recovered from the record high water temperatures seen last year.  We will keep you posted on how the Wildlife and Parks department feels the spring spawn went and whether or not you should be more concious about catching, taking a photo and posting it to ShotemandCaughtem and releasing your catch or enjoying your hard work in a perfect meal.