Hello Guest, please sign in to comment

The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

blog subhead pic
Tuesday, 15 October 2013 17:53

Perfect Storm Bad for Moose

We at Shotem and Caughtem thought we would pass along some information so that the hunting community could help aid in research surrounding a large population decrease in Moose which will have a large effect on hunting permits.  Researchers are trying to figure out causes associated with a halving of Moose population across a wide range of the North American continent.  

Three things seem to be having the greatest effect on the Moose.  Weather, Bugs and Food.  Shorter winters and increase temperatures are causing the cool friendly Moose to work harder to keep their body temperatures low.  Because of the warmer temperatures bugs such as beetles who eat the Moose cover, ticks and worms that carry disease they are causing more Moose to become sick.  These bugs are also causing a depletion of trees that the Moose use for cover from predators, regulate body temperature and as a food source.  

The declining Moose population could cause more problems than just for hunters.  As always many species are dependent on Moose.  Their a food source for apex predators, keep forage low for birds and trees trimmed for other herbivores.  

We can help scientist answer questions when out in the field.  Providing data from the Moose we make contact with such as location, health, and looking the animal over when it comes to coats, horns etc could all be vital information to help to cause.  Contact the Minnesota Department of Wildlife which seems to be the one spear heading the research should you have any information on Moose in your area http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/index.html 

As always keep posting photos and leave your comments in the section below.  It is part of our duty as hunters to help make sure future generations get the opportunity to hunt these majestic animals.