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The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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Thursday, 05 June 2014 21:48

If we were to Ban Hunting and Fishing

No Hunting No Hunting

With the recent news of Metallica's front man James Hetfield taking heat for just being the voice of a new hunting series, we at Shotem and Caughtem felt it was once again time to search the internet for more articles related to the subject of hunting.  Right wrong or indifferent, however, one might feel about the subject no one nation or country feels the effects of this debate more than Africa.  A constant struggle between available resources, a huge human population and not enough food produced to sustain growth.  No one knows the battle better than those who live that life day to day.  We already have some great members who share their adventures from this region so it was not hard for us to turn to resource that would report on what is happening through their own eyes.  We hope that you take the time to read and forward this well written article to those who judge without proper evidence of just how beneficial our passion for this lifestyle can be and it's effects.  A big thanks to All Africa for sharing their views.  

Here is just a brief excerpt from the article the link to the full article is below:

Put very simply - if wildlife does not generate benefits, it will be displaced by agriculture and other land uses. Even national parks must provide benefits to neighbouring communities if they are to be viable conservation entities, rather than isolated islands surrounded by conflicting land uses and communities hostile to conservation.

By allowing wildlife management to be a viable land use, with both hunting and tourism providing the returns, large tracts of African habitat can be maintained in a healthy state. This includes habitat for valuable, rare and endangered species such as rhino, elephant, lion, leopard, cheetah and numerous other species. In Namibia, healthy populations of all these species occur in communal areas, on private land and in national parks - simply because they generate income. Take away legal trophy hunting, and wildlife will be the loser. Commercial poaching is minimal in Namibia, because poaching is seen as stealing from local communities. In the very few incidents of rhino poaching, the help of local people has lead to the arrest of the culprits.

What of the ethical and moral implications of hunting a wild animal?

At some stage, each individual animal must die. That is part of the cycle of life itself. Generally, old or weak wild animals die a painful or violent death - either from starvation or disease, or by being killed and eaten by predators, or by being killed by rivals of their own species.

But the overall population continues to thrive - as long as there is enough suitable habitat available.

Saying 'I don't want any animals to die' does not help the situation. Becoming a vegetarian will not save any African wildlife. Condemning legal hunting does not help either. African land is needed to generate livelihoods - if these livelihoods are not generated through wildlife use, then wildlife disappears. The less wildlife is used, the less it will be able to survive.

Eating game meat is in fact an ecologically sustainable option, because it adds another area of income that gives people the incentive to allow wildlife to remain on the land.

Trophy hunting generally focuses on post-reproductive males, as these have the most mature trophies. Only a very small percentage of the population is hunted (0.5 to 2%), with no impact on the overall health of the species.

To read more of this article follow the link http://allafrica.com/stories/201406050519.html