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The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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Wednesday, 27 November 2013 22:39

Thankful for Mother Nature

We at Shotem and Caughtem hope all our members and followers have a wonderful, safe and stress free holiday weekend.  It is a time to be thankful for all that we have in our lives.  For the hunting and fishing community we would be remiss not to be thankful for Mother Nature and all that has been provided to us.  In that spirit we hope that your table will be dressed with the wonderful bounties provided to us through hard work and dedication that many take for granted.  We leave you this weekend with a poem to remind you to get outdoors and share with others our passion.  Happy Thanksgiving!

Tuesday, 26 November 2013 23:12

Our Top Wild Turkey Recipes

Since many of us at Shotem and Caughtem have procured our own fresh Wild Turkeys to add to our Thanksgiving Day tables we felt we would share a couple of our favorite recipes.  Let us know your favorites in the comment section below.

Cajun Deep-Fried Turkey

  • 2 cups butter 

  • 1/4 cup onion juice 

  • 1/4 cup garlic juice 

  • 1/4 cup Louisiana-style hot sauce 

  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce 

  • 2 tablespoons ground black pepper 

  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 

  • 7 fluid ounces beer 

  • 3 gallons peanut oil for frying, or as needed 

  • 1 (12 pound) whole turkey, neck and giblets removed

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion juice, garlic juice, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper, cayenne pepper and beer. Mix until well blended.

Use a marinade injecting syringe or turkey baster with an injector tip to inject the marinade all over the turkey including the legs, back, wings, thighs and breasts. Place in a large plastic bag and marinate overnight in the refrigerator. Do not use a kitchen trash bag. If your turkey is large, you can use an oven bag.

When it's time to fry, measure the amount of oil needed by lowering the turkey into the fryer and filling with enough oil to cover it. Remove the turkey and set aside.

Heat the oil to 365 degrees F (185 degrees C). When the oil has come to temperature, lower the turkey into the hot oil slowly using the hanging device that comes with turkey deep-fryers. The turkey should be completely submerged in the oil. Cook for 36 minutes, or 3 minutes per pound of turkey. The turkey is done when the temperature in the thickest part of the thigh reaches 180 degrees F (80 degrees C). Turn off the flame and slowly remove from the oil, making sure all of the oil drains out of the cavity. Allow to rest on a serving platter for about 20 minutes before carving.

Honey Smoked Turkey

     1 (12 pound) whole turkey 


  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage 

  • 2 tablespoons ground black pepper 

  • 2 tablespoons celery salt 

  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 

  • 1 (12 ounce) jar honey 

  • 1/2 pound mesquite wood chips


Preheat grill for high heat. If you are using a charcoal grill, use about twice the normal amount of charcoal. Soak wood chips in a pan of water, and set next to the grill.

Remove neck and giblets from turkey. Rinse the bird and pat dry. Place in a large disposable roasting pan.

In a medium bowl, mix together sage, ground black pepper, celery salt, basil, and vegetable oil. Pour mixture evenly over the turkey. Turn the turkey breast side down in the pan, and tent loosely with aluminum foil.

Place the roasting pan on the preheated grill. Throw a handful of the wood chips onto the coals. Close the lid, and cook for 1 hour.

Throw about 2 more handfuls of soaked wood chips on the fire. Drizzle 1/2 the honey over the bird, and replace the foil. Close the lid of the grill, and continue cooking 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until internal temperature reaches 180 degrees F (80 degrees C) in the thickest part of the thigh.

Uncover turkey, and carefully turn it breast side up in the roasting pan. Baste with remaining honey. Leave the turkey uncovered, and cook 15 minutes. The cooked honey will be very dark.

 

Cuban Wild Turkey


  • 3 heads garlic, peeled 

  • 1 tablespoon black pepper 

  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin 

  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano 

  • 2 tablespoons salt (or to taste) 

  • 2 cups fresh lemon juice 

  • 1 cup dry white wine 

  • 1/2 (12 fluid ounce) can frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed 

  • 1 (16 pound) turkey


Crush the peeled garlic cloves, and place into a large bowl. Season with pepper, cumin, oregano, and salt. Pour in lemon juice, wine, and orange juice concentrate; whisk together until well mixed.

Using a sharp paring knife, pierce the turkey breast, thighs, and legs; creating holes for the marinade to penetrate. Pour the marinade over turkey, and into the holes. Finally, stuff garlic pieces into the holes. Cover the turkey well, and refrigerate overnight to marinate.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).

Roast turkey in the preheated oven until the internal temperature of the thickest part of the thigh measures 180 degrees F (80 degrees C), about 5 hours. Baste the turkey every 30 to 45 minutes. Once the breast has browned, cover loosely with aluminum foil to prevent it from becoming burnt.

Friday, 22 November 2013 22:50

Hunting Wild Boar in the Cold

We at Shotem and Caughtem will be heading down south this weekend to take in a little hog hunt before opening season for deer.  Since it should be a cold one we thought we might throw out a couple of cold weather tactics we use when out hunting hogs in the cold.  Let us know your tips in the comment section below.  

Hunting feral pigs in the winter is not much different than hunting them in the summer.  The only difference is their need to cool off in the water or in bogs tends to be dramatically less during the colder months.  The advantage to hunting hogs in the colder climates is that the pigs tend to burn more calories to stay warm, so they are in constant need of a good food source.  Since hogs do not see well, much of their movement will still be under or close to the cover of darkness.  Even when temperatures drop they still tend to move at night or close to dark.  Cold weather does however, keep them a little more active during the day than you would typically see during the summer months due to the need for food should you not have the ability to hunt at night.  Because of this we find that hunting food sources or places where the hogs must travel to get to these places from there bedding spots are the best place to find hogs.  Look for heavy rooting and track marks in crop fields, treed areas with acorns, berries and leftover nuts from the fall drop should put you on track with where the pigs will be coming to and from.    

Lucky for us where we are going not only allows lights but night hunting as well.  This should increase our chances of landing a hog.  You will notice that many of the photos you see with people standing by their prized food source are night photos.  We tend to see good activity between the hours of 8-12pm and about 2-5am.  Windy nights will tend to keep them in cover but they will still need food.  Should wind be high check close to hedge rows or edges of fields since they will not travel far from wind cover.  If stalking pay close attention to wind direction since no matter what they will smell you coming from quite a distance away.

Most of all we hope to get in a little rifle practice right before the start of the season so that we can pack some pig next to our deer meat in the freezer.  We find the smaller pigs tend to eat the best.  80-120 pound hogs seem to make the best hot links and sausages.  Good Luck this weekend and hope you too will have a Shotem and Caughtem weekend.  We hope you will join us in our galleries soon.

 

Wednesday, 20 November 2013 23:32

Poaching Causes More Harm than Legal Hunting

With all the news surrounding Melissa Bachman's legal hunt we at Shotem and Caughtem thought it was ironic that today we read about a poachers capture at the hands of the same thing that started the Bachman debate.  Poachers busted from posting to their facebook page. Ironic don't you think.  Poaching whether it be an african rhino or our beloved red fish is the cause of much of the pressure put on wild animal populations.  Whether it be shark fin, ivory, rhino horn, yellowfin tuna etc., a combination of the market for goods created by these animals and the price tag associated with these goods, spurs poaching which is an epidemic that must be stopped.  Many ask how do we accomplish these goals?  The hunting and fishing permits and funds created by the industry are used to protect our natural resources.  They also make sure the fish and wildlife departments have the funds to capture and investigate people such as this.  

A South Texas man has pled guilty to nine charges of possession of oversized red drum, one charge of no saltwater fishing license, and one charge of exceeding the possession limit for red drum.

The investigation leading to the filing of charges against 30-year-old Luis Castro began with a Facebook post showing a man holding a large red drum with eight other oversize drum on display in the bed of a pickup truck. (The bag limit for redfish is three per day, and they must be between 20 and 28 inches. Only one redfish longer than that can be kept, and only with a properly completed redfish tag attached to it.)

On Nov. 1, game wardens in Cameron County were contacted about the Facebook picture, which had originally been placed on line by Castro’s brother. Accompanying the image was the comment, “just for fun.”

Game wardens ended up receiving multiple complaints regarding the Facebook post. TPWD dispatchers and game wardens were able to review records which eventually resulted in the positive identification of Castro and his place of employment.

On Nov. 6, game wardens interviewed Castro and obtained a signed written statement. Five days later, Willacy County Justice of the Peace George Solice issued an arrest warrant for Castro and game wardens arrested him the same day. Following arraignment, he was released with a court date of Nov. 19.

“Anglers on several social media sites were posting negative comments, and a day after the picture was originally posted, it was removed,” said Game Warden Maj. Alan Teague. “However, the picture had been saved by many anglers and reposted.”

Teague said the picture made it to fishing groups as far away as Florida.

“With tips from anglers and hard work by our game wardens and dispatchers, we were able to track the individual to a city in South Texas,” Teague said.

During sentencing, Justice of the Peace Solice noted how important recreational fishing is to the people in Willacy County which includes Port Mansfield.  Before sentencing Castro, the judge pointed out that there are people in the county whose livelihood depends upon the quality and future of recreational fishing.

“It was an obscene number of fish that you caught,” the judge said to the defendant.  “We are all living paycheck-to-paycheck but none of us are going hungry.  It was completely unnecessary to take that many fish.”

Castro was fined $2,600 and an additional $2,645.91 will be assessed as part of the civil restitution.

Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below and as always post photos of your legal hunts to the galleries and share your adventures.  

Tuesday, 19 November 2013 22:51

Melissa Bachman and the Hunting Debate

We at Shotem and Caughtem built this website to share and celebrate the great outdoors.  We come from a family of non hunters and have had many conversations about the pros and cons of hunting.  The debate spurred recently around Melissa Bachman is no different.  We as outdoorsman/woman have always had to defend our passion for the outdoor lifestyle.  As a matter of fact it was not until the industrial revolution that hunting and fishing even hit the spot light.  Lucky for us we have Mara as a member of our site so we were able to go direct to the source for answers.  We hope you add your debatable comments in the comment section below.  Here is what she let us know.

Hi Shotem and Caughtem Staff,

Melissa Bachman hunted at Maroi Conservancy a couple of weeks ago. She only hunted plains game here (Zebra, Nyala etc.). On her wish list was a lion. There are no lions on Maroi as they do not occur here naturally. 

We contacted an outfitter in the North West Province and we facilitated the hunt for Melissa. After making sure that all the legal documentation was in place, we transported her to this area where she was handed over to another outfitter and PH.

Foreign hunters have a big impact on the economy; hunting contributes significantly to conservation, tourism development, job creation and sustainable development in rural areas. This area has many game farms and services for game farms that use the funds generated by hunting or eco-tourism to contribute to conservation. Examples of things that the funds get used for includes:  Supplying water to game, planting and stockpiling feed for draught conditions, rebuilding border fences, roads, dams that were washed away during the January 2013 floods, combatting erosion and employing specialist anti-poaching units to protect our game.

Hunting permits for specific animals are only issued by Nature Conservation if the farm where the hunt takes place, comply to the rules and regulations laid down by Nature Conservation. They also take into account how many permits have been issued in the area, population numbers, how big the property is, how long the lions have been free roaming in the area etc.

Almost everybody is under the impression that this was a canned lion hunt. Unfortunately you get canned lion hunts in South Africa and that is specifically why we made sure that the hunt was legal, all documentation in place and the lion was free roaming. You can contact PHASA on more information about the requirements for a lion hunt. We basically referred Melissa to another outfitter and we did not profit financially from this hunt at all.

It is important to know the difference between a canned lion hunt and captive breeding for hunting on an open area where the lion is free roaming on 2000ha. A Lion is still a very dangerous predator, stalking a lion on a large property.


Please feel free to ask me any more questions as I will be happy to give you the facts. You can also have a look at Maroi Conservancy’s facebook page for more facts. There is a status update that contains more facts. Feel free to use that information also. 

Kind Regards 

Mara Nel 

Maroi Conservancy



Monday, 18 November 2013 22:23

Lead Manufacturing Plant Closing

We at Shotem and Caughtem read some news that will effect us both as hunters and fisherman/woman and felt all should know that some of our costs might rise.  The last remaining lead smelting plant in the United States will be closing its doors.  This could have effects in ammunition used by hunters and much of the equipment used by the fishing industry such as lure parts and sinkers.  

The Doe Run lead smelter in Herculaneum, Missouri, established in 1892, will close in December due to EPA regulations on air quality.

According to AmmoLand, “The Herculaneum smelter is currently the only smelter in the United States which can produce lead bullion from raw lead ore that is mined nearby in Missouri’s extensive lead deposits, giving the smelter its ‘primary’ designation.  The lead bullion produced in Herculaneum is then sold to lead product producers, including ammunition manufactures for use in conventional ammunition components such as projectiles, projectile cores, and primers.  Several ‘secondary’ smelters, where lead is recycled from products such as lead acid batteries or spent ammunition components, still operate in the United States.”

What this means, though, is that ammunition manufacturers will have to get primary lead bullion from overseas sources such as China.

Let us know how this will effect your hunting and fishing lively hood in the comment section below and keep posting photos of your adventures in the galleries and tell us your story.

 
Thursday, 14 November 2013 22:25

Hunters and Conservation Amazing Video

We at Shotem and Caughtem take great pride in what we have the opportunity to see and experience in the great outdoors.  We have said time and time again that this sport and lifestyle offers us the opportunity to see things many never get the chance to experience.  As hunters we are constantly reminded of how powerful animals are in the wild.  At the same time we know that in order to make sure animals are available to the next generation we must help to protect our resources.  

The attached video showcases all these aspects.  Bucks commonly get their horns locked in a good fight for dominance to breed.  As such many times these animals can become tangled.  Unless lady luck steps in and the two are capable of freeing themselves from one another, many times both will perish.  Luckily for these two a couple of guys were willing and able to step in to lend a hand.  

It is amazing to think that these animals might have been this way for sometime before being discovered, yet still had enough power and energy to keep fighting.  

Leave your comments on similar experiences in the comment section below or share your videos and photos of like adventures in the galleries.  

Wednesday, 13 November 2013 23:05

Good Pheasant Hunting in Utah

We here at Shotem and Caughtem have not heard good things for the start of upland bird hunting in our area.  As such we thought we might find out where the hot spots were this year so that we might share with others on a good place to go find birds.  What we found is that Utah might be the place to go for some great Pheasant hunting this year.

More than 11,000 pheasants will be released by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources on public hunting areas during this season's pheasant hunt.  The 11,000 birds are more than six times the number released last fall and 20 times the number released in 2011.  This year's Utah general pheasant hunt opened at 7:30 a.m. Saturday and runs until Nov. 17 across most of the state.  The DWR and Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife worked together to buy the birds, which will be released in areas that have good pheasant habitat and good access for public hunters. 

In the Top of Utah area, birds will be released at the Howard Slough Wildlife Management Area, the Ogden Bay Wildlife Management Area, the Harold Crane Wildlife Management Area and near Willard Bay.  Birds will also be released on select walk-in access areas in Box Elder, Cache, Emery, Utah and Wayne counties.

For directions and a complete list of release locations, visit http://utahdnr.maps.arcgis.com .

Let us know how hunting season is going in your area in the comment section below and post pics of your adventures in the galleries.

Tuesday, 12 November 2013 23:12

Cold Weather Fishing Tips

Though we at Shotem and Caughtem definitely have hunting on our minds we would be remiss to not discuss the huge advantages to cold weather fishing.  There are many advantages to the cold weather.  One huge advantage is that cld weather hunting or fishing is not for the faint of heart.  Dedication to the outdoors even in the cooler temperatures can yield some monster fish.  Better yet is that many fair weather fisherman/woman have already hung up their rods and have opted to stay indoors which means less competition.  Here are some tips to get you started on landing your Monster Catch.  

 

Monday, 11 November 2013 23:42

Veterans Day Launches The Rut

We at Shotem and Caughtem find it fitting that in a celebration of our Troops and the sacrifices they have made, that it is also the day that has launched the rut here in the Midwest.  As hunters we know that weather can be one of the key ingredients to launch a change in Mother Nature.  We have been watching deer patterns in our area and have began to notice that does have began to move earlier and earlier in the day.  Many of our fellow hunters have noticed smaller bucks chasing young and mature does.  All we were missing was a cold snap to hit the rut button.  Lucky for us our friends from the North have pushed a cold front down across the Midwest.  

Those signs can mean only one thing.  The big boys are coming out to join the crowd.  So to our fellow hunters we would like to say get out your rattlers and get into the field.  There is no better way to settle into trophy season than during the rut.  Be Patient and follow the signs that are going to begin to show in the form of large rubs as to what is moving through your area.  Setting yourself along or next to large rub marks should allow you to land the big one in your area by rattling and calling in a challenger.  

Let us know how things are progressing in your area in the comment section below and keep posting your photos to the Shotem gallery.    

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