Hello Guest, please sign in to comment

The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

blog subhead pic

Hunting and Fishing News

We at Shotem and Caughtem are constantly scouring the internet looking for news about the industry so we can pass it on to our members and followers.  Without your support we will not grow and hopefully one day be known as the place to go to see what is happening around the world when it comes to hunting and fishing.  A great place to share photos, videos and experiences from the great outdoors.  However, once again the news seems to be targeting our passions.  Matthew McConaughey recently had to take a step back from a ranch owned by him and his brother due to hunting controversy.  Kid Rock and Ted Nugent made it into the news with a hunting picture posted by the rock stars.

A Safe Place to post Hunting/Angling Photos and Videos

The old saying "If you don't like what is on change the channel!"  The digital age has created some interesting ways to bully and sometimes no way to get away from something you don't want to see.  Twitter has introduced a new way to spread viral discussions by posting things that have high retweet or favorites to other peoples twitter streams that have no affiliation to the original person who posted the information.  As a matter of fact this type of practice is what many think has allowed ISIS to spread their message and grow their support.  

More Targeted Social Networks

We feel that as the world wide web evolves more niche social networks will become the norm.  Those of us that have a passion for hunting and fishing do not want to see information about the next best weight loss pill.  We want to see the latest gear, best hunting and fishing tactics and converse with those that have the same outdoor adventures.  That is why we continue to ask for your help in growing our network.  We think we have provided our members with a great platform to share their adventures and knowledge to other like minded people.  However, we need more.  More of your friends, family and other cool kids to get on board and share.  We understand that facebook, instagram and twitter have the numbers but they did not start out that way.  As the smaller networks like ours begin to grow the site will begin to snowball.  

We hope you come share as much as you can so that we can start to attract more and more and become the social network you choose because the people here just know two things and know it well.  Hunting and Fishing!

Published in News/Events
Wednesday, 22 January 2014 23:15

Hunting Back in the News

Some of us here at Shotem and Caughtem did not come from a long line of hunters or fisherman.  We did not learn how to shoot until we starting hanging out with certain crowds.  Some did not end up enjoying what they had to offer.  Others found the passion for the lifestyle and dedicated more and more time to the outdoors.  Hunting and fishing is not for everyone as is the case with anything.  So we were not surprised when it came up for conversation with part of our family when the news broke of the 350,000 Black Rhino hunt being auctioned off by a Dallas Outfitter.  What follows is only part of our justification for what our industry does for wildlife conservation.  

Namibia is just about the only place to have gotten conservation right for rhinos and a lot of other wildlife. It has methodically repopulated one area after another as its rhino population has steadily increased. As a result, it is now home to 1,750 of the roughly 5,000 black rhinos surviving in the wild. (The worldwide population of Africa’s two rhino species, black and the more numerous white, plus three species in Asia, is about 28,000.) In neighboring South Africa, government officials stood by haplessly as poachers slaughtered almost a thousand rhinos last year alone. Namibia lost just two.

Namibia has the advantage of being home to only 2.1 million people in an area twice the size of California — about seven per square mile, versus about 100 in South Africa. But Namibia’s success is also the product of a bold political decision in the 1990s to turn over ownership of the wildlife to communal conservancies — run not by white do-gooders, but by black ranchers and herders, some of whom had, until then, also been poachers.

The idea was to encourage villagers living side by side with wildlife to manage and profit from it by opening up their conservation lands to wealthy big-game hunters and tourists armed with cameras. The hunters come first, because the conservancies don’t need to make any investment to attract them. The Ministry of Environment and Tourism sets limits on all hunting, and because rhino horn is such a precious commodity, rhinos remain under strict national control.

The theory behind the conservancy idea was that tolerance for wildlife would increase and poaching would dwindle, because community ownership made the illegal killing feel like stealing from the neighbors. And it has worked. Community conservancies now control almost 20 percent of Namibia — 44 percent of the country enjoys some form of conservation protection — and wildlife numbers have soared. The mountain zebra population, for instance, has increased to 27,000 from 1,000 in 1982. Elephants, gunned down elsewhere for their ivory, have gone to 20,000, up from 15,000 in 1995. Lions, on the brink of extinction from Senegal to Kenya, are increasing in Namibia.

Under an international agreement on trade in endangered species, Namibia can sell hunting rights for as many as five black rhinos per year, though it generally stops at three. The entire trophy fee, in this case $350,000, goes into a trust fund that supports rhino conservation efforts. The fund pays, for instance, to capture rhinos and implant transmitters in their horns, as an anti-poaching measure. Trophy hunting one rhino may thus save many others from being butchered.

Many wildlife groups also support the program because Namibia manages it so carefully. It chooses which individual will be hunted, and wildlife officials go along to make sure the hunter gets the right one. (So much for the romance of the Great White Hunter.) The program targets older males past their breeding prime. They’re typically belligerent individuals that have a territorial tendency to kill females and calves.

Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below.  

Published in News/Events