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The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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We at Shotem and Caughtem heard the news that Tennessee residents are pressuring the state to open a feral pig hunting season.  We thought this would make a great debate for all to way in on the subject.  Here are some details and our thoughts.  Let us know what you think in the comment section below.

An official with the Tennessee Wildlife Commission met with concerned hunters Tuesday who want to open a new hunting season.  Their goal is to open a feral hog hunting season and allow them to use dogs when they track them. They say the animals have caused significant damage on private and public land.  Right now, hunters can kill feral hogs, but only if they get an exemption from the state.  The five counties asking for the changes are Polk, Monroe, White, Bradley and McMinn.

Though we think that feral hogs are more than a pain, there are some things we have noticed in surrounding states that we feel have worked best for this invasive species.  Wild Boar have covered much of the southern states since Christopher Columbus released the first pigs from his boat.  As many know pigs are not natural to North America.  If you travel to Texas to hunt wild pigs they will give you a stack of tags for a nominal fee.  In Oklahoma however, they decided to also create a hunting season for pigs and charge a pretty high price to do so for revenues sake.  It has backfired.  Many hunting properties began trapping pigs in Texas and importing them into the state in order to make a buck.  As such the number of pigs has doubled in the state in a relatively short amount of time.  Missouri has taken a different approach.  Kill them all.  No tags, no license, just get rid of them.  They have been able to keep the population fairly in check.  They are an impressive animal with even more impressive breeding capabilities.  They can survive in almost any climate and can double their numbers in months.

Which side of the debate and what are your thoughts on the subject?   

 
Published in News/Events
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 23:32

Poaching Causes More Harm than Legal Hunting

With all the news surrounding Melissa Bachman's legal hunt we at Shotem and Caughtem thought it was ironic that today we read about a poachers capture at the hands of the same thing that started the Bachman debate.  Poachers busted from posting to their facebook page. Ironic don't you think.  Poaching whether it be an african rhino or our beloved red fish is the cause of much of the pressure put on wild animal populations.  Whether it be shark fin, ivory, rhino horn, yellowfin tuna etc., a combination of the market for goods created by these animals and the price tag associated with these goods, spurs poaching which is an epidemic that must be stopped.  Many ask how do we accomplish these goals?  The hunting and fishing permits and funds created by the industry are used to protect our natural resources.  They also make sure the fish and wildlife departments have the funds to capture and investigate people such as this.  

A South Texas man has pled guilty to nine charges of possession of oversized red drum, one charge of no saltwater fishing license, and one charge of exceeding the possession limit for red drum.

The investigation leading to the filing of charges against 30-year-old Luis Castro began with a Facebook post showing a man holding a large red drum with eight other oversize drum on display in the bed of a pickup truck. (The bag limit for redfish is three per day, and they must be between 20 and 28 inches. Only one redfish longer than that can be kept, and only with a properly completed redfish tag attached to it.)

On Nov. 1, game wardens in Cameron County were contacted about the Facebook picture, which had originally been placed on line by Castro’s brother. Accompanying the image was the comment, “just for fun.”

Game wardens ended up receiving multiple complaints regarding the Facebook post. TPWD dispatchers and game wardens were able to review records which eventually resulted in the positive identification of Castro and his place of employment.

On Nov. 6, game wardens interviewed Castro and obtained a signed written statement. Five days later, Willacy County Justice of the Peace George Solice issued an arrest warrant for Castro and game wardens arrested him the same day. Following arraignment, he was released with a court date of Nov. 19.

“Anglers on several social media sites were posting negative comments, and a day after the picture was originally posted, it was removed,” said Game Warden Maj. Alan Teague. “However, the picture had been saved by many anglers and reposted.”

Teague said the picture made it to fishing groups as far away as Florida.

“With tips from anglers and hard work by our game wardens and dispatchers, we were able to track the individual to a city in South Texas,” Teague said.

During sentencing, Justice of the Peace Solice noted how important recreational fishing is to the people in Willacy County which includes Port Mansfield.  Before sentencing Castro, the judge pointed out that there are people in the county whose livelihood depends upon the quality and future of recreational fishing.

“It was an obscene number of fish that you caught,” the judge said to the defendant.  “We are all living paycheck-to-paycheck but none of us are going hungry.  It was completely unnecessary to take that many fish.”

Castro was fined $2,600 and an additional $2,645.91 will be assessed as part of the civil restitution.

Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below and as always post photos of your legal hunts to the galleries and share your adventures.  

Published in News/Events
Tuesday, 19 November 2013 22:51

Melissa Bachman and the Hunting Debate

We at Shotem and Caughtem built this website to share and celebrate the great outdoors.  We come from a family of non hunters and have had many conversations about the pros and cons of hunting.  The debate spurred recently around Melissa Bachman is no different.  We as outdoorsman/woman have always had to defend our passion for the outdoor lifestyle.  As a matter of fact it was not until the industrial revolution that hunting and fishing even hit the spot light.  Lucky for us we have Mara as a member of our site so we were able to go direct to the source for answers.  We hope you add your debatable comments in the comment section below.  Here is what she let us know.

Hi Shotem and Caughtem Staff,

Melissa Bachman hunted at Maroi Conservancy a couple of weeks ago. She only hunted plains game here (Zebra, Nyala etc.). On her wish list was a lion. There are no lions on Maroi as they do not occur here naturally. 

We contacted an outfitter in the North West Province and we facilitated the hunt for Melissa. After making sure that all the legal documentation was in place, we transported her to this area where she was handed over to another outfitter and PH.

Foreign hunters have a big impact on the economy; hunting contributes significantly to conservation, tourism development, job creation and sustainable development in rural areas. This area has many game farms and services for game farms that use the funds generated by hunting or eco-tourism to contribute to conservation. Examples of things that the funds get used for includes:  Supplying water to game, planting and stockpiling feed for draught conditions, rebuilding border fences, roads, dams that were washed away during the January 2013 floods, combatting erosion and employing specialist anti-poaching units to protect our game.

Hunting permits for specific animals are only issued by Nature Conservation if the farm where the hunt takes place, comply to the rules and regulations laid down by Nature Conservation. They also take into account how many permits have been issued in the area, population numbers, how big the property is, how long the lions have been free roaming in the area etc.

Almost everybody is under the impression that this was a canned lion hunt. Unfortunately you get canned lion hunts in South Africa and that is specifically why we made sure that the hunt was legal, all documentation in place and the lion was free roaming. You can contact PHASA on more information about the requirements for a lion hunt. We basically referred Melissa to another outfitter and we did not profit financially from this hunt at all.

It is important to know the difference between a canned lion hunt and captive breeding for hunting on an open area where the lion is free roaming on 2000ha. A Lion is still a very dangerous predator, stalking a lion on a large property.


Please feel free to ask me any more questions as I will be happy to give you the facts. You can also have a look at Maroi Conservancy’s facebook page for more facts. There is a status update that contains more facts. Feel free to use that information also. 

Kind Regards 

Mara Nel 

Maroi Conservancy



Published in News/Events