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The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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Okay so anyone who knows the Shotem and Caughtem creators knows that one of our absolute favorite seasons is Dove Season.  Nothing says hunting to us like the capabilities of hanging out with good friends, in relatively good weather (sometimes a bit warm), hunting an animal that allows you to spend really good quality time while procuring the filet mignon of the skies.  So when we were made aware last year that our fellow hunters to the north were going to get the chance to have the same fun that we were we were ecstatic.  So we were even more concerned when we were made aware today that there was a bill on the floor to potentially revoke that right prior to their first season.  Here are the details.

For more than a decade, sportsmen in Iowa fought for the opportunity to pursue North America’s number one game bird – the mourning dove.

Last year, the hard work and dedication finally paid off as the Iowa legislature passed Senate File 464 authorizing dove hunting in the state.

Now, just months after the first successful dove hunt, anti-hunting activists are pushing to have the season banned.

On January 19th, State Representative Mary Mascher (D-Iowa City) introduced House File 2061 that would prohibit dove hunting in the state.

Iowa sportsmen should contact their state representatives and ask them to vote no on House File 291.  

Let us know your thoughts on the bill or if you have more information on who to contact to oppose this bill in the comment section below.  As always post your photos and stories to the galleries.  September will be here before you know it!!!

Published in News/Events

We at Shotem and Caughtem typically do a seed mix from a local seed market to create the perfect wildlife food plot.  However, since we launched this site to inform people of products related to hunting and fishing we decided we would break from our normal routine and try some pre made products.  This year we traveled to Gander Mountain to see what our local store might have in stock and our options.  We were surprised that many of the products carried in stock were mainly for big bucks.  Though we love deer season, the amount of work it takes to install a food plot makes us want to attract more than just deer.  We like to make sure we have the opportunity to hunt all types of wild life and support our full ecosystem.  With this in mind we were disappointed that there was not a one solution option.  The company that provided the most options in stock that we decided to create our wildlife buffet was from Evolved Harvest.  We selected the four options above which we felt provided the most variety for the wildlife we intended to support but as you can see focused a lot on deer.  Again we only wanted to go off of what one can get on short notice since we like many farmers like to time planting to a good rain forecast like we had for this week.

We decided that these four products offered our best options with these criteria in mind.  A food plot that would keep a steady stream of wild life happy.  The soy beans, forage rape, turnip, clover would keep the deer more than happy.  The oats, sunflower, grain sorghum, and chicory for all things bird.  Granted we would have liked to have an option that would better cover the multitude of animals we love to see year round but this is what our options were in stock.  Cost was 90 dollars after tax.  

We wanted to give the product a less than ideal test bed to work from to really get a good test.  Since many food plots are created in less than ideal situations we wanted to do the same.  We choose a place that had never been used for this type of test.  It is a pasture that has raised cattle since it was stead ed in the late 1800's.  It had been grassland its whole life.  It did have some positives on its location as seen in the photos below.  It is right along a well traveled wildlife trail along a wooded creek in a small valley.  We did not test the soil.  But we wanted a good test of how good the product can preform in an untested rural area.  Places we like to hunt and enjoy the great outdoors.    

We first brush hogged the grass as low as possible.  Then because it was undisturbed ground we disc-ed the area several times to break the soil just enough for planting.  The more roughed up photo shows the soil conditions after we planted.  We broad casted the seed in separate strips so that over the next couple of seasons the crop would have room to grow.  In all the bags planted about half of the 3 acre patch we prepped.  It took us most of the weekend to get the ground to a point we were comfortable would be a good test of the products capabilities.  

We will keep you posted on growth and conditions as the season begins so that you to can make an educate decision on the products you choose and a true test of effectiveness.  Let us know the products you have used in the past and how they worked in the comment section below.  Or post your food plot photos to the gear section and let us know what you used and why.  

We at Shotem and Caughtem are starting to get things prepped for food plot planting season.  Any experienced hunter knows that a successful food plot can not only help lure game to their property but also provide conservation measures to ensure wildlife populations.  There are many products available that will help to create and manage your food plot, but we have also found some alternative seed sources and practices that might aid in creating a successful habitat source for wildlife on your property.  

First rule of a successful food plot, location, location, location.  All wildlife need the three basics.  Water, food and shelter.  They also like to have all these close to one another in order to avoid predators.  If a person plants a food plot away from any of these three factors it will more than likely not gain you anything when it comes to wildlife.  Therefore pick or clear a spot where your wildlife can take advantage of all three neccessities without having to subject themselves to stress from predators.  A quarter to half an acre food plot per 25 acres seems to be the going rule from what we have learned.  It should be located next to a shelter belt with good cover and close to a water source.

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