Hello Guest, please sign in to comment

The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

blog subhead pic
Monday, 21 July 2014 22:04

Prepping for Hunting Season

Getting ready for the Hunt

As many of you already know their is no such thing as an off season when it comes to those with a passion for hunting and fishing.  As such with hunting season quickly approaching DOVE SEASON!, sorry we love this time of year, there are plenty of things that need to be done way before the season arrives.  The last thing one wants to do is have their human scent on every leaf of a property before the season gets into full swing.  As such there are plenty of things to do before hunting season so here are just a couple of the things we tried to get accomplished this past weekend and lets see if you agree.

Preparing your hunting location

First things first.  Mowing.  We have neglected much of the property since the pasture was burned due to large amounts of rain.  As such the grass is tall.  Too tall as a matter of fact.  Any prey species is weary of walking into heavy tall grass that could slow escape or cover a potential predator.  With the grass being 3 feet tall and thick the deer are only using their own usual worn paths and the turkey are using surrounding properties or fields, which doesn't work for us.  The best way to bring them down our paths is to make sure the appropriate paths are mowed and permit travel of turkey and deer to our feeders and snacks and open up large areas allowing the animals to feel safe from predation.

Create Shooting lanes and hunting environment

Also many new trees have sprouted or limbs that are now blocking our shooting lanes.  Trees have fallen, limbs litter paths all creating an obstacle that could deter animals from moving into areas we would rather them not move.  Maintaining and looking for new potential avenues and foraging areas can help grow your potential shooting locations for different animals.  Making sure your animals have places to hide, paths to walk and a great place for you to hunt requires a little up keep every year. (tip:  dove for some reason love to use dead trees to perch.  Clearing an area, planting some of those dead limbs and or trees in an open field or close to water will give you a great spot to hunt).

Proper Scouting for Hunters

Scouting your area once your upkeep has been done can help you track your improvements and make sure you have time to tweak your ideas prior to the season.  Once you have done a little prep set your trail cameras up with the intent to move them around and see where animals are heading.  Just because you feel you have made the perfect animal oasis does not mean that they might not be using the path you like to take to get there as their path as well and you could be spooking animals with your scent before they ever make it to you.  Should you need to move stands, feeders etc. starting to see your animals movements earlier can give you plenty of time to adjust prior to hunting season.  

Scent eliminator suggestions

Have any early prep tricks and tips you like to use.  Share with us in the comment section below.  As always the early bird gets the worm and then gets to share their prize to one of the walls once the season is in full swing.  

 

 

Published in News/Events

We at Shotem and Caughtem hoped that we would be telling you that the app is ready for download.  We are so close we can taste it.  Just one final tweak and we will be announcing its release to our members only first.  If you have not become a member yet we suggest you do as we will allow our members to be the first to know for awhile till we actually alert the public and media.  

Celebrating our rights to Hunt and Fish

The 4th of July is a time we all celebrate our independence and freedoms.  We celebrate those who have made the ultimate sacrifice defending those freedoms with some high quality outdoor time.  We will be out testing more of the products given to us by Berkley and Anglers Choice.  We could not be more excited to get back out on the water.  Working on the app has taken away most of our free time and getting outdoors.

History of hunting and fishing

Hunting http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunting    Fishing http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_fishing

 

Bullying Hunters and Anglers

It has been another interesting week for those that love to hunt and fish.  Yet another person is being trashed for their passion of the lifestyle.  Kendall Jones, 19, has been taking heat from posting her photos to her facebook page.  We feel it is just a matter of time before this type of action is taken against those who also use social networks like instagram, twitter, etc.  Luckily for our members this type of posting is what we are all about.  Those who have a passion for the great outdoors now have a place to share their adventures without fear of being ridiculed.  However, if you still want to post photos to your other networks you can still share to those other networks through Shotem and Caughtem.  If you get a little heat from those on other networks you can still direct people to your individual profile so that they can still view your adventures. (example www.shotemandcaughtem.com/chauncey)

Most of all we are excited to hopefully get the chance to tell you about the app release!  We hope all our members have a safe, fun and exciting holiday weekend.  Most of all should you be out this weekend we hope you share your adventures to our members and your network.  Have a wonderful Shotem and Caughtem weekend! 

Published in News/Events

A lifelong bond between those who Hunt and Fish

We at Shotem and Caughtem recently found out that one of our closest friends is moving to another state for work and it got us thinking.  The bond between those who enjoy the great outdoors with one another.  The bond created amongst those who we fish and hunt with that are hard to come by and replace.  The time spent in the great outdoors with those who have the same passion can create some of the funniest stories, greatest moments of accomplishment and an amazing relationship.  We don't really know how to explain it, but one thing is for sure, there is no other relationship in the world like the one you have with your hunting and fishing buddy. There is a bond there that can never be broken. You could not see or speak to him/her for years and know exactly the right words when it comes time to say them. You have an understanding between each other about life that never has to be spoken, but yet is always understood.

A Social Network dedicated to keeping and preserving the outdoor bond

It is why we started this website.  The bond of trash talking, taunting one another with the biggest racks, catches and the most birds is what gave us the idea for the website.  The mishaps section came from some of our funniest memories from the field and water.  For the better part of two decades we can not remember being in the field without one another.  The move to another state will most definitely put a distance between the times we head out into the great outdoors with one another.  Those times will definitely be missed.

However, now that we almost have the app completed we will always have Shotem and Caughtem.  A place to tag one another, brag and share our stories from a far.  It will give us new opportunities to hunt and fish and create new stories.  It is what we are all about.  That bond and stories now have a new place to call home.  We even make it easier to connect with one another with individual profile names such as www.shotemandcaughtem.com/chauncey

Yes it is time for the next chapter in our stories with one another.  Though the time we spend together in the outdoors will become smaller, we will no doubt never forget the time we have had nor the great times ahead.  Good luck and all the best.  Can't wait to write our next chapter together!

 

Published in News/Events
Thursday, 05 June 2014 21:48

If we were to Ban Hunting and Fishing

With the recent news of Metallica's front man James Hetfield taking heat for just being the voice of a new hunting series, we at Shotem and Caughtem felt it was once again time to search the internet for more articles related to the subject of hunting.  Right wrong or indifferent, however, one might feel about the subject no one nation or country feels the effects of this debate more than Africa.  A constant struggle between available resources, a huge human population and not enough food produced to sustain growth.  No one knows the battle better than those who live that life day to day.  We already have some great members who share their adventures from this region so it was not hard for us to turn to resource that would report on what is happening through their own eyes.  We hope that you take the time to read and forward this well written article to those who judge without proper evidence of just how beneficial our passion for this lifestyle can be and it's effects.  A big thanks to All Africa for sharing their views.  

Here is just a brief excerpt from the article the link to the full article is below:

Put very simply - if wildlife does not generate benefits, it will be displaced by agriculture and other land uses. Even national parks must provide benefits to neighbouring communities if they are to be viable conservation entities, rather than isolated islands surrounded by conflicting land uses and communities hostile to conservation.

By allowing wildlife management to be a viable land use, with both hunting and tourism providing the returns, large tracts of African habitat can be maintained in a healthy state. This includes habitat for valuable, rare and endangered species such as rhino, elephant, lion, leopard, cheetah and numerous other species. In Namibia, healthy populations of all these species occur in communal areas, on private land and in national parks - simply because they generate income. Take away legal trophy hunting, and wildlife will be the loser. Commercial poaching is minimal in Namibia, because poaching is seen as stealing from local communities. In the very few incidents of rhino poaching, the help of local people has lead to the arrest of the culprits.

What of the ethical and moral implications of hunting a wild animal?

At some stage, each individual animal must die. That is part of the cycle of life itself. Generally, old or weak wild animals die a painful or violent death - either from starvation or disease, or by being killed and eaten by predators, or by being killed by rivals of their own species.

But the overall population continues to thrive - as long as there is enough suitable habitat available.

Saying 'I don't want any animals to die' does not help the situation. Becoming a vegetarian will not save any African wildlife. Condemning legal hunting does not help either. African land is needed to generate livelihoods - if these livelihoods are not generated through wildlife use, then wildlife disappears. The less wildlife is used, the less it will be able to survive.

Eating game meat is in fact an ecologically sustainable option, because it adds another area of income that gives people the incentive to allow wildlife to remain on the land.

Trophy hunting generally focuses on post-reproductive males, as these have the most mature trophies. Only a very small percentage of the population is hunted (0.5 to 2%), with no impact on the overall health of the species.

To read more of this article follow the link http://allafrica.com/stories/201406050519.html 

Published in News/Events

We at Shotem and Caughtem all know the great power mother nature holds.  Whether fishing, hunting or just wandering around the great outdoors, the relative peace and time with friends and family without distraction can provide a sense of rest and relaxation.  Combine this with our celebration of those who have risked their lives for our freedoms and you create a passion for the great outdoors and the healing power she can provide.  We felt this was a perfect weekend to pay tribute to those organizations who already provide these opportunities to our veterans.  There is a vast amount of resources available in every state through the wildlife and parks divisions for those who have served, however, there are also a large amount of groups who provide hunting and fishing opportunities in different states to all those who have or are serving this nation.  Though we have only listed a handful here we hope you let us know about your organization in the comment section below.  To all our service men and woman, past and present, we hope you have a wonderful Shotem and Caughtem Holiday weekend.  

Thank You,

Shotem and Caughtem Staff 

www.woundedwarriorsinaction.com  The Wounded Warriors in Action Foundation Inc. (WWIA) serves our Nation’s combat wounded Purple Heart recipients by providing world-class outdoor sporting activities as a means to recognize and honor their sacrifice, encourage independence and connections with communities, and promote healing and wellness through camaraderie and a shared passion for the outdoors.

www.woundedwarrioroutdoor.com  Wounded Warrior Outdoors provides this all-inclusive adventure at absolutely no cost to the servicemen and women, their families or the government. Transportation, lodging, meals and documentation of the adventure is provided free of charge. It is because of this arrangement that Wounded Warrior Outdoors relies entirely on private donations. Administration, general offices and personnel services are donated.

www.operationwearehere.com  To provide a comprehensive list of resources for the military community and its supporters

www.operationsecondchance.org  In 2006, Operation NPLB, formerly known as No Person Left Behind, was founded as an independent charity that allows like-minded professional hunters, fisherman, and outdoor-minded people to ensure that disabled veterans always receive the best outdoor hunting and fishing opportunities. NPLB has always provided wounded warriors with services complimentary to those offered by OSC, and in March of 2011 NPLB became a permanent part of Operation Second Chance.

www.sponsorahunt.com  Sponsor A Hunt began as a novel idea during a deployment is 2011. The goal was to create more resources for soldiers to connect with the hunting community and find hunting opportunities where ever the military moved them. As a military family, we have relocated many times and wished we could find more opportunities at our new duty stations. We feel hunting should be enjoyed by everyone.  We are dedicated to finding and providing opportunities worldwide for outdoor enthusiasts. We appreciate the support we have received from the hunting community and will continue to offer the most information, resources, and opportunities available.

www.woundedwarriorproject.org  With the mission to honor and empower Wounded Warriors, WWP is the hand extended to encourage warriors as they adjust to their new normal and achieve new triumphs. Offering a variety of programs and services, WWP is equipped to serve warriors with every type of injury – from the physical to the invisible wounds of war.

Published in News/Events

When we at Shotem and Caughtem first got the idea of creating a social network the task seemed extreme.  Sure there are plenty of forums on the web around the subject but nothing that incorporated all the advantages that an engaging network could accomplish.  We also noticed that many of the people who hunt and fish only really share with people who hunt and fish on instagram, facebook, youtube and twitter.  However, those companies are huge in their memberships, it will be too hard to get traffic to us.  Luckily for us this first year of growth has been small but awesome.  Those we have attracted to the site have been great in helping us find our true stride in the outdoorsman and woman market.  Also, with the recent bashing of people who hunt and fish on these larger platforms we are finding more and more who want to find a place to get away from those who don't share the outdoor passion.  

One of the biggest requests has been an app.  A place where we can control our entire outdoor experience from where we tend to be......out in field or on the water.  Well we at Shotem and Caughtem are excited to tell you that we listened and the app is being developed as we speak.  We are hoping to release the beta model to some of our members in the coming month.  If you too want to be a part of helping us create a social network app for you our members and would like to help us find the glitches we encourage you to become a part of our site.  You can also go to www.shotemandcaughtem.com/chauncey , become a friend and send me a message letting me know you would like to be one of the first to check out the new app.  Don't worry even if you don't want to help and your just excited to get it on your phone?  The app will be free as well and available for both the android and iphone markets.  

We hope you are as excited as we are and help us spread the word once the the app hits the market.  Thanks as always for being a part of Shotem and Caughtem we can't thank you enough for all the support you have given us over the past year.  Android and IPhone apps now available http://www.shotemandcaughtem.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&layout=item&id=282&Itemid=491  

Published in News/Events

We at Shotem and Caughtem have been watching the debate in legal African hunting and the fall out from some groups against some hunters who have taken part in the experience.  It is definitely a debate.  We have always tried to explain some of the many pros that come from the passion we hold so dear to our hearts and our passion for what we do and how we effect the world around us.  Many of us spend much of our time making sure we have the opportunity to continue to go out every year and enjoy our adventures.  In order for this to happen we make sure to create habitats that sustain and build a higher population of our favorite animals.  Also as stated time and time again much of the money that comes from permits, licenses etc. are pumped back into the system to enhance public habitat and to make sure rules are followed.  

Africa however has suffered from a black market for it's prized animals for centuries.  Poaching is a way of life unfortunately.  As such we as hunters try to support the hunting industry with our money to allow us the opportunity to hunt in the country.  We suggest you read the article and help as hunters to educate those about our passion and the benefits that come from our lifestyle.  http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/05/06/controversy-swirls-around-the-recent-u-s-suspension-of-sport-hunted-elephant-trophies/

Published in News/Events

We at Shotem and Caughtem are right in the middle of Spring turkey hunting season.  We already have some birds in the freezer and have been hunting for new ways to cook our rewards from the field.  There are also some huge benefits to wild turkey which we have also listed below to help give you more reasons to fill your tags.  Let us know your favorite ways to cook wild turkey in the comment section below.

 

 

Published in News/Events
Friday, 02 May 2014 16:50

Hunting Turkey's and Conservation

We at Shotem and Caughtem try to continue and stay on the topic of how hunting effects conservation.  Many groups feel that hunting is the cause of many of the problems involved in wildlife habitat and survival.  We felt like since spring turkey season is in full swing or ending in many areas we would find a story that once again talk about the great things that happen in our wildlife environment that promotes why we do what we do in a conservation capacity.  Our dollars from tags, permits, and taxes go to help promote the well being of the animals we cherish.  Let us know about your conservation effort and how you help the cause in the comment section below.

In 1974, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources agreed to send 135 Coulee Region ruffed grouse to Missouri in exchange for 334 eastern wild turkeys.

The turkeys were released in different locations around the state for a three-year period, beginning in 1976.

As far as conservation is concerned, it may be one of the best trades the state has ever made. For it was that exchange which successfully re-established the wild turkey population in Wisconsin.

For all intents and purposes, unregulated hunting and a variety of natural factors left the state without wild turkeys since roughly 1881.

After decades of futile attempts to reintroduce turkeys by releasing birds that were raised on farms, the batch of birds from the Show Me State put Wisconsin’s population on the fast track to recovery. By 1983, the state was able to hold its first modern-day statewide turkey season. In 2009, hunters in Wisconsin harvested more turkeys than any other state in the union.

Today, the DNR divides the state into seven zones. Manitowoc County is in Zone No. 2.

Last year, hunters in Zone 2 harvested 8,955 birds during the spring hunt, for a hunter success rate of 21.3 percent, the highest mark across all seven zones. The previous spring, hunters in Zone 2 took 10,486 birds, a 26 percent hunter success rate which was, once again, tops in the state.

Scott Walter, an upland wildlife ecologist with the WDNR, says that the quality of habitat in the area is the primary reason hunters in the area have seen so much success in recent years.

“It’s simply the way the landscape is managed. It provides a nice heterogeneous mix of open habitats and forested habitats in which they tend to do very well,” Walter said. “Just by nature, this nice mix of wood lots and agriculture...provides a super habitat base.”

The spring season is divided into six weeks, with each hunting permit good for only one of those six weeks. The third week begins today. In spring, hunters may only take male turkeys, allowing the females to nest undisturbed.

While the turkey population has, generally, been steadily increasing, Walter pointed out that the experience of any particular hunter may vary based upon long-term and short-term weather trends.

“I think it has certainly become clear to those of managing turkeys and hunters themselves that we have turkeys established in healthy numbers statewide,” Walter said. “But, we’re going to have to expect that, from one year to the next, the number of birds we see in the field are going to go up and down based on what weather conditions have been like the past year or two.”

Walter added that weather conditions are especially crucial two times per year: winter, when snow cover can deny birds access to food, and late spring, when warm temperatures and small amounts of precipitation help facilitate the nesting process. As the numbers of turkeys continues to rise, so does the number of hunters pursuing them. The WDNR made 237,420 permits available this spring, a fair increase from the 234,985 of last spring.

“Probably the only thing that increased more than the turkey population itself was the interest in this new hunting opportunity,” Walter said. “Our state hunters just embraced this. It’s a chance to get out in the woods in the spring, which is one of the things that makes the spring turkey hunt unique. In terms of hunting, there aren’t many other opportunities out there that time of year.”

Turkey hunting and the turkey population have made significant strides in Wisconsin in recent decades. But Walter maintains there is still work to be done.

“Getting the next generation engaged in this, now firmly-entrenched, tradition of turkey hunting in Wisconsin is going to be really important,” Walter said. “It’s something that we all have to think about, at least those of us who are passionate about the hunting tradition.”

Walter also called upon current hunters to make sure they are respecting the land they hunt on.

“When turkey hunters are out in the field they have to respect the land and the property owner rights, especially if the happen to be hunting on private land. Closing gates, not littering, and being respectful of the land you’re on is going to be really important in terms of maintaining a positive public image of turkey hunting in general.”

Walter hopes all of the effort he and other wildlife officials and organizations have, and will continue to, put forth will continue to help others experience something that many in this state went their entire lives without: a morning in a turkey blind.

“It’s just a really unique and special experience, “ Walter said. “It’s hard to put into words. The sun’s coming up, that gobbler is up on the ridge belting away and the ability to interact with that bird through the calling, through the use of decoys and to have him coming in, it’s a very interactive hunt that just leaves memories.”

Published in News/Events
Wednesday, 30 April 2014 19:49

New York DEC takes over Wild Pig Hunting

We at Shotem and Caughtem have talked many times about wild boar hunting and the problems associated with this nuisance animal.  However, we have also said that it takes a united front when it comes to the elimination of animals of this caliber.  As many states already know many programs have been enacted on a government level to control populations of boa, wild hogs, lizards, snake head, carp, etc.  The list is long and the government man power and budget is scarce.  Just in our state alone we might have 1 Wildlife and Parks official that covers hundreds of thousands of acres.  These short staffed individuals are not provided the resources needed to keep an invasive species at bay.  That is why we feel New York might be making a huge mistake while populations remain small and manageable but making this decision.  Let us know your thought in the comment section below.

A new state regulation prohibits hunting or trapping of free-ranging Eurasian boars in New York State.

The ban was announced by state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens. He said the regulation is designed to ensure maximum effectiveness of DEC's statewide eradication efforts.

"Enacting a statewide regulation was important to support DEC's ongoing work to remove this invasive species from the state and to ensure that it does not become established in the wild anywhere in New York," said Commissioner Martens. "Eurasian boars are a great threat to natural resources, agricultural interests, and private property and public safety wherever they occur and DEC will continue to work to protect these resources and remove wild boars from the state."

Eurasian boars were brought to North America centuries ago and wild populations numbering in the millions are now present across much of the southern U.S. In recent years, wild boar populations have been appearing in more northern states too, often as a result of escapes from enclosed shooting facilities that offer "wild boar hunts," the DEC said.

Governor Cuomo signed legislation on Oct. 21 that immediately prohibited the importation, breeding or introduction to the wild of any Eurasian boars.

Furthermore, the law prohibits possession, sale, transport or marketing of live Eurasian boars as of Sept. 1, 2015. The new law was an essential step in the state's efforts to prevent Eurasian boars from becoming established in the wild, the DEC said.

However, there are already small numbers of Eurasian boars on the landscape in New York. Since 2000, wild boars have been reported in many counties across the state, and breeding in the wild has been confirmed in at least six counties (Tioga, Cortland, Onondaga, Clinton, Sullivan and Delaware) in recent years.

The DEC is working closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Services program to remove any Eurasian boars that are reported in New York. To date, more than 150 animals have been captured and destroyed, the DEC said.

These efforts appeared to have made a difference. Officials said late last year that there wasn't a single report of a wild boar seen or taken locally. However, they are not willing to say that they've been completely taken off the local landscape. The feeling is that some folks, for whatever reason, are keeping quiet about what animals remain out there.

Meanwhile, the eradication efforts are expensive, time consuming and requires a great deal of manpower,according to the DEC.

"Hunters have offered to assist our efforts by hunting for boars wherever they occur, but experience has shown this to be counter-productive," Martens said. "As long as swine may be pursued by hunters, there is a potential conflict with our eradication efforts. Eurasian boars often join together to form a 'sounder,' the name for a group of pigs that can number 20 or more individuals. Shooting individual boars as opportunities arise is ineffective as an eradication method often causes the remaining animals to disperse and be more difficult to remove."

Hunters pursuing wild boars in locations where baited traps have been established by DEC or USDA can also undermine these costly and labor-intensive capture efforts.

Shooting may remove one or two animals, but the rest of the sounder scatters and rarely comes back together as a group, thereby hampering eradication efforts, the DEC said.

The new regulations also prohibits anyone from disturbing traps set for wild boars or otherwise interfering with Eurasian boar eradication activities. Hunting wild boar is still allowed at enclosed hunting preserves until Sept. 1, 2015.

The regulation does provide necessary exceptions for state and federal wildlife agencies, law enforcement agencies, and others who are authorized by DEC to take Eurasian boar to alleviate nuisance, property damage, or threats to public health or welfare, the DEC said.

If you've seen a Russian wild boar or any other type of feral pig, call the DEC's Cortland office at 1-607-753-3095, Extension 247, or email the DEC at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and include "Eurasian boar" in the subject line.. Photographs of the animals are especially helpful, so try to get a picture and include it with your report.

 
Published in News/Events
Page 3 of 16