Hello Guest, please sign in to comment

The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

blog subhead pic
Tuesday, 07 January 2014 23:18

Arctic Temps Will Change Whitetail Movements

Many states across the US are in Whitetail deer season.  Whether your are in the midst of rifle season or on bonus doe season the current weather conditions will have an affect on where you are going to find your prey.  We at Shotem and Caughtem thought we might provide hunters with some tips on where deer go to get out of the cold so that you spend less time in the elements.  We also felt it was a good chance for us to remind you to stay warm and look for signs that you might need to head in from the cold.  As always let us know your thoughts in the comment section below and stay warm. 

In winter, deer move to suitable cover. They move around less and decrease their metabolism and body temperature. This biological “fine-tuning” enables deer to conserve energy and survive our northern winters. Landowners in areas with deer winter range can have a direct influence on deer survival. The effects can be positive or negative. There are pros and cons about providing food for deer during the winter. 

In late summer and fall deer build up fat that will become winter fuel. Acorns and beech nuts -- often referred to as “mast” -- are valuable sources of this fat. Fat reserves can supply almost one third of a deer’s winter energy needs. Deer also produce hormones that regulate body activity. You might think deer would “crank up the heat” to stay warm, but the opposite is true. During winter the deer you see may appear normal, but internally they are operating in slow motion. Body temperature is lowered, particularly in the legs and ears. As the quality and quantity of the food declines, body functions such as digestion are also slowed. 

Deer also develop highly insulated winter coats. Dense inner fur and long, hollow outer hairs create a coat 10 times thicker than the summer coat. Newly-attired, they head for traditional winter ranges known as “deer yards.” 

Ideal wintering areas provide the shelter of conifers close to food supplies. Deer are able to conserve energy by “yarding up”. Conifers such as hemlock, cedar, pine and spruce catch snow on their branches and thus reduce the depth of snow beneath. Deer pack accumulated snow into a network of trails and runways. Trails allow deer to move easily between food and cover, saving valuable energy reserves. Conifers also reduce winds and moderate the temperature. On cold nights temperatures beneath heavy conifer cover can be ten degrees warmer than in open areas. Deer spend many hours lying under the protective boughs of these evergreens. 

In winter, deer subsist on buds and twigs of deciduous trees and shrubs such as yellow birch, hazel, dogwood, mountain, striped, red and sugar maple. Cedar and hemlock foliage also provide food. 

As winter progresses, the survival of deer depends on three primary factors: the amount of stored fat, the availability of natural foods, and the severity of the winter. Added stress or mortality can be caused by predators such as wolves or free-running dogs.

Things to watch for when out in the elements during these arctic temperatures.

Frostbitten skin will become warm and swollen and feel as though it's on fire. Blisters may develop, but popping them can cause scarring, according to the National Weather Service. If skin is blue or gray, very swollen, blistered or feels hard and numb, go to the hospital immediately.

Frostbite stages:

  • First degree: ice crystals forming on your skin
  • Second degree: your skin begins to feel warm, even though it is not yet defrosted.
  • Third degree: your skin turns red, pale, or white.
  • Fourth degree: pain lasts for more than a few hours, and you may see dark blue or black areas under the skin. See a doctor immediately if these symptoms arise. Gangrene is a real threat.

Hypothermia occurs when a person's body temperature is below 96 degrees, and temperatures as low as 60 degrees can cause hypothermia

Published in News/Events
Tuesday, 31 December 2013 22:20

Our New Years Resolution is You

We at Shotem and Caughtem have reflected a lot on the first year of our website.  It has been a blessing to have started what we feel is a unique website dedicated to hunting and fishing.  It has all the makings to be a hunter or fisherman/woman's first place to share and connect with others.  A place  where people like Melissa Bachman, Phil Robertson and you our members can feel comfortable sharing their adventures and opinions on the lifestyle to which we dedicate so much time, efforts and money.  A place safe from those who might not agree with the way we choose to live our lives.

That is why our New Years resolution is you.  We promise to dedicate this year to further creating a home for all who enjoy this lifestyle to continue to share their experiences.  Good or bad.  Share with the rest of the world to try and educate and inform on why we do what we do and what we use to do it.  Even share those experiences when things don't go as planned. 

However, inorder to make this the website that you choose to make your home we need your help.  A social network is nothing without you our members.  We need to here from you as to what you need from a great hunting and fishing social network.  So we ask you to help us to continue to make a place you want to be a part. 

We have some great things in store this year and hope you help us to continue our dream of creating the first and foremost hunting and fishing community.  So become a member and help us shape this brave new world on the web.  Happy New Years.  Make it a safe and joyous year outdoors!

Published in News/Events
Tuesday, 24 December 2013 17:22

Happy Holidays From Shotem and Caughtem Staff

We at Shotem and Caughtem felt this was the perfect time to emerge from the dark and wish all of our members and followers a safe and merry holidays.  There is no better time for us hunting and fishing enthusiasts to reflect on the year and the things to come.

First we would like to thank all of you for participating in the first social network dedicated to hunting and fishing.  It has been an amazing first year.  We have thripled our members to the site, facebbok and twitter.  We have met some amazing people and companies and hope that 2014 will be more of the same. 

Secondly, like most outdoor lovers the things we experience and witness in the great outdoors offers us a unique view of the world around us.  Like Phil Robertson our respect for the things that have been created and the experiences in the field create a passion for our beliefs and a realization that life is precious and should be celebrated.  Our rights as Americans gives us opportunities that many only read about and never have the chance to experience. 

Thirdly, we are excited about all the things next year has in store.  We will once again be visiting the Shot Show in Las Vegas.  We have a wonderful review that will be posted soon for our friends at Weston Products and Anglers Choice and finally we have met some other passionate outdoorsman/woman who will help give another perspective of their experiences in the great outdoors.

It is an exciting time for us here at Shotem and Caughtem and we hope you join us in sharing your photos, comments and experiences.  We hope to continue to make www.shotemandcaughtem.com the best hunting and fishing social network.  We once again hope you have a safe and fun holiday vacation and enjoy some time in the great outdoors.

Published in News/Events
Friday, 06 December 2013 23:44

Opening Day Of Rifle Season

Opening Day of Rifle hunting season was a mixed bag as always.  As many fail to realize too many times who have never gone hunting or fishing, they do not call it shooting and catching.  We got a look at a proud eight point buck but never got a clear shot.  We did have the opportunity at a small seven and a six.  However, when they began to spur with one another at eighty yards the sight was just too precious to ruin.

What an amazing animal.  The two walked in out of the trees on an absolutely freezing cold afternoon to grab a snack from the still green grass hidden amongst the trees.  They were the only two animals we had seen all day.  As they strolled into the field they acted like the best of friends.  Looking out for one another as one another leaned down to eat.  Then way off in the distance a doe appeared.  By the marking on the sides of the two bucks you could tell the rut had apparently come and gone but they were still fairly fresh.  We felt the pair would continue to eat.  However, her interest in the two men must have spurred a little extra energy.  They began to lock horns.  Though the fight was short and lack a lot of aggression, it was our first opportunity to witness in person a fight between men.  It was magnificent.  We can say that sitting in the cold for over eight hours just to witness this stand between men was totally worth it.  

The night before with friends is always the highlight.  The day and a half spent listening to nothing but the sounds of the forest refreshing.  The chance to unplug from the world if only for a short time relaxing.  And though we did not put much meat in the freezer, we would not have traded the freezing cold experience and lack of meat.

It is why we built Shotem and Caughtem.  Our friendships, family and lives are better because of these two loves.  A since of peace and appreciation for what we have in our lives is what we return with every time.  The fact that we might add a little meat to the freezer is just a bonus.  Have a great Shotem and Caughtem weekend and we hope though the weather might be frosty you get outdoors!

Published in News/Events
Monday, 02 December 2013 23:48

Hunting Deer During Rifle Season Tactics

Due to the fact that the Midwest will begin its rifle hunting season this week, we at Shotem and Caughtem thought we might go after the age old debate when rifle hunting deer, Shot Placement.  We as hunters always debate this issue and it is one of the first lessons we learn as hunters.  Where is the best place to shoot a deer so that we have a better chance of recovery.  On big game of any type many will tell you the best place is to go for a lung and heart shot right to the rear of the front shoulders.  However, we thought we would do a little research and get some others perspective.  We hope you leave your comments below.

We have already seen that deer run nearly 50 percent of the time when they are mortally wounded. Certainly, shot placement is the most important factor related to how deer react after being shot. Several types of trauma can lead to the rapid death of an animal that is struck by a bullet. Significant trauma to the central nervous system, the respiratory system or the circulatory system will all prove effective.

Deer shot in the neck and spine were immediately rendered immobile and succumbed quickly. Deer that were shot broadside in the shoulder ran a mean distance of 3 yards while animals hit in the heart, lungs or abdomen traveled 39, 50 and 69 yards respectfully.

So what shot placement is the best. Neck shots work well, but they can be problematic because the target area is very small and there is a risk of wounding associated with the target. Potential problems include a shot to the esophagus or mandible. Also, spine shots can be ruled out as a recommenced shot because few shots are consciously directed at the spine. In other words, most spine shots result from shots that miss their mark high and incidentally hit the spine.

The best shot placement for deer is the broadside shot directed at the shoulder. Traveling an average of only 3 yards, deer shot in the shoulder traveled significantly less distance than deer shot in the heart, lungs, or abdomen. Also, with such a short distance of travel, deer shot squarely in the shoulder did not generally leave the hunter’s sight.  The broadside shoulder shot essentially gave results similar to what most hunters expect from a neck shot. Presumably the broadside shoulder shot works well because it strikes part of the heart and or lungs which itself is a mortal blow. However, a shot through the scapula damages the brachial plexus which is part of the central nervous system thereby rendering the animal immobile. It knocks the animal out and it never regains consciousness. Also, the shoulder is a very large target offering room for error; a high shot hits the spine, a low shot the heart and a shot to the rear hits the lungs.


Published in News/Events
Wednesday, 27 November 2013 22:39

Thankful for Mother Nature

We at Shotem and Caughtem hope all our members and followers have a wonderful, safe and stress free holiday weekend.  It is a time to be thankful for all that we have in our lives.  For the hunting and fishing community we would be remiss not to be thankful for Mother Nature and all that has been provided to us.  In that spirit we hope that your table will be dressed with the wonderful bounties provided to us through hard work and dedication that many take for granted.  We leave you this weekend with a poem to remind you to get outdoors and share with others our passion.  Happy Thanksgiving!

Published in News/Events
Friday, 22 November 2013 22:50

Hunting Wild Boar in the Cold

We at Shotem and Caughtem will be heading down south this weekend to take in a little hog hunt before opening season for deer.  Since it should be a cold one we thought we might throw out a couple of cold weather tactics we use when out hunting hogs in the cold.  Let us know your tips in the comment section below.  

Hunting feral pigs in the winter is not much different than hunting them in the summer.  The only difference is their need to cool off in the water or in bogs tends to be dramatically less during the colder months.  The advantage to hunting hogs in the colder climates is that the pigs tend to burn more calories to stay warm, so they are in constant need of a good food source.  Since hogs do not see well, much of their movement will still be under or close to the cover of darkness.  Even when temperatures drop they still tend to move at night or close to dark.  Cold weather does however, keep them a little more active during the day than you would typically see during the summer months due to the need for food should you not have the ability to hunt at night.  Because of this we find that hunting food sources or places where the hogs must travel to get to these places from there bedding spots are the best place to find hogs.  Look for heavy rooting and track marks in crop fields, treed areas with acorns, berries and leftover nuts from the fall drop should put you on track with where the pigs will be coming to and from.    

Lucky for us where we are going not only allows lights but night hunting as well.  This should increase our chances of landing a hog.  You will notice that many of the photos you see with people standing by their prized food source are night photos.  We tend to see good activity between the hours of 8-12pm and about 2-5am.  Windy nights will tend to keep them in cover but they will still need food.  Should wind be high check close to hedge rows or edges of fields since they will not travel far from wind cover.  If stalking pay close attention to wind direction since no matter what they will smell you coming from quite a distance away.

Most of all we hope to get in a little rifle practice right before the start of the season so that we can pack some pig next to our deer meat in the freezer.  We find the smaller pigs tend to eat the best.  80-120 pound hogs seem to make the best hot links and sausages.  Good Luck this weekend and hope you too will have a Shotem and Caughtem weekend.  We hope you will join us in our galleries soon.

 

Published in News/Events
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 23:32

Poaching Causes More Harm than Legal Hunting

With all the news surrounding Melissa Bachman's legal hunt we at Shotem and Caughtem thought it was ironic that today we read about a poachers capture at the hands of the same thing that started the Bachman debate.  Poachers busted from posting to their facebook page. Ironic don't you think.  Poaching whether it be an african rhino or our beloved red fish is the cause of much of the pressure put on wild animal populations.  Whether it be shark fin, ivory, rhino horn, yellowfin tuna etc., a combination of the market for goods created by these animals and the price tag associated with these goods, spurs poaching which is an epidemic that must be stopped.  Many ask how do we accomplish these goals?  The hunting and fishing permits and funds created by the industry are used to protect our natural resources.  They also make sure the fish and wildlife departments have the funds to capture and investigate people such as this.  

A South Texas man has pled guilty to nine charges of possession of oversized red drum, one charge of no saltwater fishing license, and one charge of exceeding the possession limit for red drum.

The investigation leading to the filing of charges against 30-year-old Luis Castro began with a Facebook post showing a man holding a large red drum with eight other oversize drum on display in the bed of a pickup truck. (The bag limit for redfish is three per day, and they must be between 20 and 28 inches. Only one redfish longer than that can be kept, and only with a properly completed redfish tag attached to it.)

On Nov. 1, game wardens in Cameron County were contacted about the Facebook picture, which had originally been placed on line by Castro’s brother. Accompanying the image was the comment, “just for fun.”

Game wardens ended up receiving multiple complaints regarding the Facebook post. TPWD dispatchers and game wardens were able to review records which eventually resulted in the positive identification of Castro and his place of employment.

On Nov. 6, game wardens interviewed Castro and obtained a signed written statement. Five days later, Willacy County Justice of the Peace George Solice issued an arrest warrant for Castro and game wardens arrested him the same day. Following arraignment, he was released with a court date of Nov. 19.

“Anglers on several social media sites were posting negative comments, and a day after the picture was originally posted, it was removed,” said Game Warden Maj. Alan Teague. “However, the picture had been saved by many anglers and reposted.”

Teague said the picture made it to fishing groups as far away as Florida.

“With tips from anglers and hard work by our game wardens and dispatchers, we were able to track the individual to a city in South Texas,” Teague said.

During sentencing, Justice of the Peace Solice noted how important recreational fishing is to the people in Willacy County which includes Port Mansfield.  Before sentencing Castro, the judge pointed out that there are people in the county whose livelihood depends upon the quality and future of recreational fishing.

“It was an obscene number of fish that you caught,” the judge said to the defendant.  “We are all living paycheck-to-paycheck but none of us are going hungry.  It was completely unnecessary to take that many fish.”

Castro was fined $2,600 and an additional $2,645.91 will be assessed as part of the civil restitution.

Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below and as always post photos of your legal hunts to the galleries and share your adventures.  

Published in News/Events
Tuesday, 19 November 2013 22:51

Melissa Bachman and the Hunting Debate

We at Shotem and Caughtem built this website to share and celebrate the great outdoors.  We come from a family of non hunters and have had many conversations about the pros and cons of hunting.  The debate spurred recently around Melissa Bachman is no different.  We as outdoorsman/woman have always had to defend our passion for the outdoor lifestyle.  As a matter of fact it was not until the industrial revolution that hunting and fishing even hit the spot light.  Lucky for us we have Mara as a member of our site so we were able to go direct to the source for answers.  We hope you add your debatable comments in the comment section below.  Here is what she let us know.

Hi Shotem and Caughtem Staff,

Melissa Bachman hunted at Maroi Conservancy a couple of weeks ago. She only hunted plains game here (Zebra, Nyala etc.). On her wish list was a lion. There are no lions on Maroi as they do not occur here naturally. 

We contacted an outfitter in the North West Province and we facilitated the hunt for Melissa. After making sure that all the legal documentation was in place, we transported her to this area where she was handed over to another outfitter and PH.

Foreign hunters have a big impact on the economy; hunting contributes significantly to conservation, tourism development, job creation and sustainable development in rural areas. This area has many game farms and services for game farms that use the funds generated by hunting or eco-tourism to contribute to conservation. Examples of things that the funds get used for includes:  Supplying water to game, planting and stockpiling feed for draught conditions, rebuilding border fences, roads, dams that were washed away during the January 2013 floods, combatting erosion and employing specialist anti-poaching units to protect our game.

Hunting permits for specific animals are only issued by Nature Conservation if the farm where the hunt takes place, comply to the rules and regulations laid down by Nature Conservation. They also take into account how many permits have been issued in the area, population numbers, how big the property is, how long the lions have been free roaming in the area etc.

Almost everybody is under the impression that this was a canned lion hunt. Unfortunately you get canned lion hunts in South Africa and that is specifically why we made sure that the hunt was legal, all documentation in place and the lion was free roaming. You can contact PHASA on more information about the requirements for a lion hunt. We basically referred Melissa to another outfitter and we did not profit financially from this hunt at all.

It is important to know the difference between a canned lion hunt and captive breeding for hunting on an open area where the lion is free roaming on 2000ha. A Lion is still a very dangerous predator, stalking a lion on a large property.


Please feel free to ask me any more questions as I will be happy to give you the facts. You can also have a look at Maroi Conservancy’s facebook page for more facts. There is a status update that contains more facts. Feel free to use that information also. 

Kind Regards 

Mara Nel 

Maroi Conservancy



Published in News/Events
Monday, 18 November 2013 22:23

Lead Manufacturing Plant Closing

We at Shotem and Caughtem read some news that will effect us both as hunters and fisherman/woman and felt all should know that some of our costs might rise.  The last remaining lead smelting plant in the United States will be closing its doors.  This could have effects in ammunition used by hunters and much of the equipment used by the fishing industry such as lure parts and sinkers.  

The Doe Run lead smelter in Herculaneum, Missouri, established in 1892, will close in December due to EPA regulations on air quality.

According to AmmoLand, “The Herculaneum smelter is currently the only smelter in the United States which can produce lead bullion from raw lead ore that is mined nearby in Missouri’s extensive lead deposits, giving the smelter its ‘primary’ designation.  The lead bullion produced in Herculaneum is then sold to lead product producers, including ammunition manufactures for use in conventional ammunition components such as projectiles, projectile cores, and primers.  Several ‘secondary’ smelters, where lead is recycled from products such as lead acid batteries or spent ammunition components, still operate in the United States.”

What this means, though, is that ammunition manufacturers will have to get primary lead bullion from overseas sources such as China.

Let us know how this will effect your hunting and fishing lively hood in the comment section below and keep posting photos of your adventures in the galleries and tell us your story.

 
Published in News/Events
Page 6 of 16