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The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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Changing Feral Hog Population Control Tactics

We at Shotem and Caughtem have not been quiet when it comes to our distaste of the feral hog species.  Our willingness to go to great lengths to help others hunt, kill and pursue their entire population.  However, the Missouri Department of Wildlife is changing its stance on their see all....kill them all policy potentially on all their federal lands.  They are starting to think that trapping might have a greater effect on the hog populations.  They are hoping that private properties also follow suit.

Here is the article should you wish to read more on the development.

 

Published in Hunter and Angler Blog
Friday, 22 November 2013 22:50

Hunting Wild Boar in the Cold

We at Shotem and Caughtem will be heading down south this weekend to take in a little hog hunt before opening season for deer.  Since it should be a cold one we thought we might throw out a couple of cold weather tactics we use when out hunting hogs in the cold.  Let us know your tips in the comment section below.  

Hunting feral pigs in the winter is not much different than hunting them in the summer.  The only difference is their need to cool off in the water or in bogs tends to be dramatically less during the colder months.  The advantage to hunting hogs in the colder climates is that the pigs tend to burn more calories to stay warm, so they are in constant need of a good food source.  Since hogs do not see well, much of their movement will still be under or close to the cover of darkness.  Even when temperatures drop they still tend to move at night or close to dark.  Cold weather does however, keep them a little more active during the day than you would typically see during the summer months due to the need for food should you not have the ability to hunt at night.  Because of this we find that hunting food sources or places where the hogs must travel to get to these places from there bedding spots are the best place to find hogs.  Look for heavy rooting and track marks in crop fields, treed areas with acorns, berries and leftover nuts from the fall drop should put you on track with where the pigs will be coming to and from.    

Lucky for us where we are going not only allows lights but night hunting as well.  This should increase our chances of landing a hog.  You will notice that many of the photos you see with people standing by their prized food source are night photos.  We tend to see good activity between the hours of 8-12pm and about 2-5am.  Windy nights will tend to keep them in cover but they will still need food.  Should wind be high check close to hedge rows or edges of fields since they will not travel far from wind cover.  If stalking pay close attention to wind direction since no matter what they will smell you coming from quite a distance away.

Most of all we hope to get in a little rifle practice right before the start of the season so that we can pack some pig next to our deer meat in the freezer.  We find the smaller pigs tend to eat the best.  80-120 pound hogs seem to make the best hot links and sausages.  Good Luck this weekend and hope you too will have a Shotem and Caughtem weekend.  We hope you will join us in our galleries soon.

 

Published in News/Events