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The Shotem' and Caughtem' Blog is the place to find the latest reviews and commentary on gear, destinations, conditions, events, and general knowledge to inform our readers and give our opinions to anyone listening.

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Friday, 22 November 2013 22:50

Hunting Wild Boar in the Cold

We at Shotem and Caughtem will be heading down south this weekend to take in a little hog hunt before opening season for deer.  Since it should be a cold one we thought we might throw out a couple of cold weather tactics we use when out hunting hogs in the cold.  Let us know your tips in the comment section below.  

Hunting feral pigs in the winter is not much different than hunting them in the summer.  The only difference is their need to cool off in the water or in bogs tends to be dramatically less during the colder months.  The advantage to hunting hogs in the colder climates is that the pigs tend to burn more calories to stay warm, so they are in constant need of a good food source.  Since hogs do not see well, much of their movement will still be under or close to the cover of darkness.  Even when temperatures drop they still tend to move at night or close to dark.  Cold weather does however, keep them a little more active during the day than you would typically see during the summer months due to the need for food should you not have the ability to hunt at night.  Because of this we find that hunting food sources or places where the hogs must travel to get to these places from there bedding spots are the best place to find hogs.  Look for heavy rooting and track marks in crop fields, treed areas with acorns, berries and leftover nuts from the fall drop should put you on track with where the pigs will be coming to and from.    

Lucky for us where we are going not only allows lights but night hunting as well.  This should increase our chances of landing a hog.  You will notice that many of the photos you see with people standing by their prized food source are night photos.  We tend to see good activity between the hours of 8-12pm and about 2-5am.  Windy nights will tend to keep them in cover but they will still need food.  Should wind be high check close to hedge rows or edges of fields since they will not travel far from wind cover.  If stalking pay close attention to wind direction since no matter what they will smell you coming from quite a distance away.

Most of all we hope to get in a little rifle practice right before the start of the season so that we can pack some pig next to our deer meat in the freezer.  We find the smaller pigs tend to eat the best.  80-120 pound hogs seem to make the best hot links and sausages.  Good Luck this weekend and hope you too will have a Shotem and Caughtem weekend.  We hope you will join us in our galleries soon.

 

Published in News/Events

We at Shotem and Caughtem love when we get the opportunity to hunt feral hogs.  We already have talked about tricks to use when night hunting and thought since the summer is upon us that we would also tell you about some tricks we use to hunt them during those hot days ahead.

Wild Boar definitely have a daily pattern.  Due to the fact that pigs don't have sweat glands they must rely on a couple of things during the hot summer days.  They need shade to get out of the sun, water sources for wallering and keeping cool and mud to keep the insects at bay.  They have a great sense of smell but they lack good vision and hearing.  So how to find a place to obtain a good shot or lure them in should you not have the luxury of a feeder.

One of the first things to look for is places where they have been coming to obtain water or to waller in the mud.  Because of their destructive patterns these areas are not hard to find.  If these places should go dry they will look in the near vicinity for options.  Like deer, pigs love to escape the heat by finding bushy areas to nap and stay cool.  You will be able to track these areas by finding game trails and looking for low hanging broken branches and tracks.  Note these areas will also be close to the water source they are using at the time.

Should you find a good wallering place and want to help your chances of luring in the animals to stay for a while for a clean shot here are some tips.  First is rotten corn.  You can take a 5 gal bucket, fill it three quarters of the way full of corn and then fill the rest with water.  Seal the bucket and leave it in the sun for a couple days and you will have what you need.  You can also use different fruits such as apples or oranges a bit of vinegar and water and do the same thing.  Another good tip is save your table scraps or unused vegetables from your kitchen place them in a bucket and then pour cherry or strawberry flavored cool aid on them to help as an attractant.  Once you find a good spot, dig a couple of holes and bury part of the bounty and throw the rest around the area to help cover your scent.  We always take out a spray bottle with diesel fuel in it and spray it on the bottom 3 feet of trees around the area.  They will rub their bodies up against the diesel laden trees and use that scent and oil as an insect repellent.

Let us know what tricks you use to lure in hogs on these hot summer days in the comment section below.  As always post your photos to the galleries and tell us about your adventures.  Most of all have fun and be safe.

Published in On Location

We at Shotem and Caughtem can not support enough the hunting of Wild Boar as not a paid expense but a necessity to curb hog populations around the United States.  Luckily, Florida has adopted a good way to curb this population.  Check out the regulations below and let us know your thoughts in the comment section below.

 

Published in News/Events